Why are projectors so expensive???

Bink

Bink

Will moderate for food
#2
My Kodak projector looks pretty damn sweet with DVD's. It's 900 lumin and operates at SVGA (which would probably be fairly average these days).

Some DVD's do tend to look better then others, but that's hardly the fault of the projector


As for VHS comparison, well DVD has no ware'n'tare resulting in flicker or noise and there's not tuning issues. I'd say DVD's have an immediate advantage there, even before comparing resolutions.

On that note, if the projector can only project at a max of 800x600 resolution, then the difference between VHS (NTSC or PAL) and DVD in that respect will be negligable at times.

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TaNG

TaNG

Moderator
#3
When I was still in high school 2 years ago we had these Sony ones. Looked pretty cool but the only useful thing that we could ever use them for was like teaching a class and u wanna project a whole computer screen onto the wall so we dont all have to crowd around this little 15" monitor.
 
wrathchild_67

wrathchild_67

Hidden Member
#4
They come in handy for multiplayer death matches. I remember on the last day of high school when we commandeered a projector to play 007 Goldeneye on N64 (4 player split screen). Twas fun. If I had the money, I'd buy a high quality projector just so I could play games on my wall in my dorm.


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O

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#5
There's a difference between projectors used for presentations, classrooms, meetings, and such, and those used for serious home theater. Not in the resolution, but the brightness and sometimes filtering. A good projector makes a TV look like a finger painting (but at a $10000+ price).

Can't really compare them to monitors though... resolutions are still not that great, XGA costs a lot in a nice projector.

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W

WuLabs

New Member
#6
right........ TV is [email protected] HDTV can go up to 1280x1024. Projectors range from 640x480($2000) to 1600x1200($10,000+). Think of a movie theater or an IMAX screen. A projector has a tiny translucent LCD screen that consists of millions and billions of pixels. The projector has to control this LCD with REALLY REALLY high precision, which is why it is soooo expensive.
 
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#7
Actually WuLabs, the LCD based projectors (while still quite nice, and often better resolution) are less expensive than the CRT based projectors. About two years ago when I looked into them, a good LCD based projector bright enough to make a good home theater started around $4000. An equivalent CRT based projector started around $10000, but offered superior brightness and clarity.

Now I'm guessing the prices have come down, and the LCD's have really caught up in quality. Still, expect to pay $10000 for a top notch projector.

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Only 30,000 to 40,000 genes in an Einstein, a Michael Jordan, or a Bach? Boy, can that God guy write tight code or what? - David Rudloff
 
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#9
That article is informative Gomez, but I'd have to question the assumption that becuase an HDTV can do 720p it can also do 1440i. If it's maximum number of scanlines possible is 1080, which is common, then it simply can't do 1440i. It may have the signal processing to display 720p, which would mean that it should (with minimal effort) have the signal processing to do 1440i, and still not have the physical ability to display 1440 vertical lines of resolution. It's like saying that if your monitor supported interlaced display, that if it's maximum normal display was 1280 x 1024 then it could always display a 2560 x 2048 interlaced picture. That's not true, in all likelyhood it would simply not have the number of pixels needed to display that reslution.

I'm pretty sure my logic is sound for LCD displays and LCD based projectors. I also think it is sound for CRT based TV's and projectors, since they're similar to a monitor in many ways, and you can't artifically inflate the number of pixels a monitor could display. I could be wrong about the CRT's though, since I can envision shifting the electron beam down half a scan line for the second pass with relative ease, but wouldn't the screen need phosphor elements to line up and correspond to this offset scan line?

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Only 30,000 to 40,000 genes in an Einstein, a Michael Jordan, or a Bach? Boy, can that God guy write tight code or what? - David Rudloff
 
Gomez Addams

Gomez Addams

New Member
#10
Yes, I agree with you. It seems to me that the author does not full grasp what interlaced video really means. Having the electronic capability and the available scan lines to are not the same thing.

I guess I need to find a more credible reference.
 

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