Toshiba notebooks -- usual software protocols

DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#1
Just bought a Toshiba Satellite A10 (PSA10C-00REH) notebook through our local Buy&Sell free ad paper. Real cheap -- dead hard drive. I've got it running 2k on a 40G Samsung 5400rpm drive.
This had XP on it originally and I have the two restore disks, but they appear to contain only a lot of small .exe and batch files. Do Toshiba not usually supply a proper install disk with their notebooks? Their website shows the model as a discontinued and lists all the specs but they seem to have absolutely nada for any downloads for the various utilities it originally had -- for example to disable and restore the trackpad via keyboard.
At this point it looks like I might have to track down all the drivers individually from the original manufacturers.
I was less than impressed with Toshiba bios and support several years ago with a P100 Toshiba, and it doesn't seem to have improved.
 
Tuttle

Tuttle

Resident Cynic
#2
Not sure where you were looking for drivers, but try support.toshiba.com, Downloads, Portables, Satellite, A10-S100 (any of the A10s should work), Go, Downloads.

You're right that it's a pain to have to install all those things separately though.
 
ThreeOnTheTree

ThreeOnTheTree

New Member
#3
As long as you have a WinXP serial number stuck on the bottom of the notebook, you can use any WinXP install disk you wish. Well, if it's an XPhome key, you need an XPhome install disc, and the same with XPpro.
 
Justintime

Justintime

Moderator
#4
Thier XP versions might be OEM, so the COA might fail to work on a PRO or HOE retail version.
 
ThreeOnTheTree

ThreeOnTheTree

New Member
#5
I've used the CDkey on the bottom before, on 3 different notebooks in fact. The activation works with no issues whatsoever. I just have a XPhome full install CD.
 
Justintime

Justintime

Moderator
#6
Sometimes it does, other times not, depending on the manufacturer. I have a few Asus, Dell and Acer Notebooks pass through here that refused the cd key at the initial setup, not even at activation. Using Windows XP OEM solved that problem.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#7
This notebook has the sticker. The only copy of Home I have is for my Compaq laptop. I recall that sometimes install cd's are coded to one manufacturer, unless you apply a workaround. I've thought about putting XP on it, but I'd want to do it from a slipstreamed disk with all the updates and some components removed.

As for Toshiba, I was using their Canadian site, and their Downloads page returned an error msg.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#8
Thanks, Tuttle. Your link took me to a page with everything I need.

Ironic that W2k needs a driver download just to get the display sorted (perhaps XP, being newer, is better at this). An Ubuntu live disk gets it right immediately. Ubuntu's live disk did this on both of my newer notebooks, and one is Intel onboard, the other is separate Mobility Radeon. I tried it on the work IBM P4 desktop -- stuck at 640x480. A business desktop with Intel integrated video should be a no-brainer.
 
ThreeOnTheTree

ThreeOnTheTree

New Member
#9
Justintime said:
Sometimes it does, other times not, depending on the manufacturer. I have a few Asus, Dell and Acer Notebooks pass through here that refused the cd key at the initial setup, not even at activation. Using Windows XP OEM solved that problem.
That's right, I have an OEM disc. I bought it for $90 about 3 years ago (came with a key), and the thing has been invaluable for notebooks. Most OEMs lack enough flexibility to setup windows like you want it. This Gateway notebook gives you one choice--full system restore on one big partition. Not only do I want 2 partitions, I don't want all the crapware installed. HP has been the best experience so far, as the rescue disk runs a standard WinXP install, then the next disk has all the drivers. The last disk lets you chose which bundled apps you want to install. Now that's what I call a well thought-out restore setup. Why can't they all be this good?
 
Hoyle

Hoyle

New Member
#10
If you really want to know, it's because most OEMs take big kickbacks to bundle software. They also can get discounts by shipping products with images of the OS, rather than with installs. I have to admit, HPs is pretty much the most forgiving - Acer is definately NOT...
 
jankerson

jankerson

Super Moderator
#11
ThreeOnTheTree said:
That's right, I have an OEM disc. I bought it for $90 about 3 years ago (came with a key), and the thing has been invaluable for notebooks. Most OEMs lack enough flexibility to setup windows like you want it. This Gateway notebook gives you one choice--full system restore on one big partition. Not only do I want 2 partitions, I don't want all the crapware installed. HP has been the best experience so far, as the rescue disk runs a standard WinXP install, then the next disk has all the drivers. The last disk lets you chose which bundled apps you want to install. Now that's what I call a well thought-out restore setup. Why can't they all be this good?

Dell does it pretty smart too, they Sent me an OEM XP CD and driver CD when I bought my Laptop. (NO BLOAT)

I pulled out the HD when I got it and Installed a new HD and it was a real OEM XP Pro CD with the Dell Codes I guess because I didn't have to punch in the CD Key.

But you can use a standard OEM Cd to load XP on it too.

I don't buy the retail vers because the OEM vers are more flexable.
 
ThreeOnTheTree

ThreeOnTheTree

New Member
#12
meh, I never thought about it that way. I can't stand all the junk that gets installed on an OEM machine. It takes forever to uninstall all the trialware.
 
jankerson

jankerson

Super Moderator
#13
ThreeOnTheTree said:
meh, I never thought about it that way. I can't stand all the junk that gets installed on an OEM machine. It takes forever to uninstall all the trialware.

I just format right away and do a fresh clean install then forget about it. :D
 
ThreeOnTheTree

ThreeOnTheTree

New Member
#17
The Acer I had a few years ago wasn't terrible, but the restore could have been better. It doesn't let you chose what software it installs, but it does let you chose partitioning. Fortunately, Acer doesn't preload a bunch of junkware, so it's not that bad, IMO. Gateway gives you no choices, and it comes loaded with trialware. :rolleyes:
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#18
I'll be able to tell you more about the Toshiba restore soon. It's running now. My explore of the disks apparently didn't figure out what is on there. :eek:
I doubt it will be a long lived install, but my curiosity got the better of me.
 
ThreeOnTheTree

ThreeOnTheTree

New Member
#19
Yeah, I always wonder what they bundle, too. Sometimes there are some nice apps hidden in there. ;)
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#20
We may never know what's on those disks. The cdrw/dvd drive that had installed W2K from a burned slipstreamed disk two nights previous wouldn't read disk 2. Then I tried my Compaq disk. No restriction on installing, but it gave an error msg about a missing boot file on the first reboot.
I think I'll have to pull the hdd and copy the install disk to it in a desktop using a 2.5" to 3.5" adapter. I'm unsure of how to handle the boot, though, how to boot it and point it to setup.
I could run the setup from a USB external cdrw, but I'm not aware of a way to boot and access a USB drive. There's no floppy on this unit.

The Toshiba recovery disk booted in Win98 dos and ran its batch and .exe files from dos, with a screen reading Symantec and Toshiba. I had seen a ghost file on the disk when I explored the contents.
 

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