Solder question, older vs newer solder formulas

J

jonny b

Computer Doctor
#1
I overheard some techs talking about solder is not the same today that was used in the past for electronics.
Are they using the same solder formula today that they did say 5 or more years ago? So I'm talking about motherboards, power supplys, computer parts?
They were mentioning silver or lead solder. Is there an article about this that I can read? I been Googling it and not found alot about this exact subject only soldering techniques getting better.
 
Steve R Jones

Steve R Jones

Administrator
#2
Guessing that you saw this at Wikipedia...

Solder

Which answers part of your question:

On July 1, 2006 the European Union Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive (WEEE) and Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) came into effect prohibiting the intentional addition of lead to most consumer electronics produced in the EU. Manufacturers in the U.S. may receive tax benefits by reducing the use of lead-based solder.
 
J

jonny b

Computer Doctor
#3
Guessing that you saw this at Wikipedia...

Solder

Which answers part of your question:

On July 1, 2006 the European Union Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive (WEEE) and Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) came into effect prohibiting the intentional addition of lead to most consumer electronics produced in the EU. Manufacturers in the U.S. may receive tax benefits by reducing the use of lead-based solder.
No, I have to go read that. The reason that I am inquiring is that I am wondering if solder today is better or weaker than the solder of yesteryear. Specially when it comes down to motherboards, laptops other electronic devices and what oxidation and age does to the solder. Is the older solder better last longer? Or does it degrade inside of the electronic components. I keep seeing power jacks fail in laptops for example.
 
jimbo1763

jimbo1763

Moderator
#4
I am no engineer-but from what I understand, the newer solder without the lead content may be more brittle, or may not be able to expand and contract with the constant heat up/cool down that electrical components undergo, and therefore the joint may split, causing a lack of continuity or at least an inconsistent connection.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#5
I was under the impression that the newer lead-free solders were a little harder to desolder -- needed higher temps.

Thanks, Steve. Your link confirms that.
 
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