[RESOLVED] Need New Intel MOBO

Ratt

Ratt

New Member
#21
Shinma was referring to the i5-2400. (3.3Ghz Turbo Boost)

Both the i5-2500 and the i5-2500K runs at the same speed with the same turbo boost (3.7Ghz Turbo Boost).

The difference:
  • Unlocked multiplier (you won't notice any difference until you start to overclock it either manually or using the motherboard's oc utility)
  • i5-2500 is equipped with Intel HD Graphics 2000
  • i5-2500K is equipped with Intel HD Graphics 3000
  • i5-2500 supports Intel vPro / TXT / VT-d / Intel® SIPP
  • i5-2500K does not support Intel vPro / TXT / VT-d / Intel SIPP

The i5-2500K with HD Graphics 3000 is better for transcoding videos.

You get what you pay for. Considering the fact that the Intel DZ68DB does not come with any mosfet cooling at all, the P8Z68-V LE is better.

If you are looking for a higher quality motherboard, consider the following:

ASUS P8Z68-V PRO

or the cheaper alternative

Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3P
 
Shinma

Shinma

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#22
Ratt has summed it up nicely.

And ditto to suggestion of using the alternative ASUS model, P8Z68-V Pro.
The only possible caveat with that model is lack of any PS/2 port(s) for keyboard/mouse, USB only for those.
For those using KVM switches w/ PS/2 and what not...
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#23
Truthfully, I've been away from the newer stuff for so long that I don't even know what "Intel vPro / TXT / VT-d / Intel® SIPP" is. Do I need it? Is it crucial for performance?

I'll not be OCing the rig. I havent OD'd anything since my K62-450! So I would think the 2500 would be fine.


Those two boards you posted make me drool. However, I'm not certain I'll be able to swing that kind of money yet. I may opt for the ASUS P8Z68-V LE and add a fan blowing directly at the board.

Now, from I've read, and from what you're both saying, I can use the 15-2500 and just connect my monitor to the vid out on the board and it will work? Does this share memory then?
 
Shinma

Shinma

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#24
The*Q* said:
... "Intel vPro / TXT / VT-d / Intel® SIPP" is. Do I need it? ...
Highly unlikely.
Those features are geared toward the enterprise environment.
e.g. Following posted at wiki:

Intel vPro technology is computer hardware technology to allow remote access to the PC (including monitoring, maintenance, and management) independent of the state of the operating system (OS) or power state of the PC.[1]. It consists of a set of features built into a PC's motherboard and other hardware.[2][1] Intel vPro technology is not the PC itself, nor is it a single set of management features (such as Intel Active Management Technology/Intel AMT) for sys-admins. Intel vPro is a combination of processor technologies, hardware enhancements, management features, and security technologies.

Intel vPro technology is intended to help businesses gain certain maintenance and servicing advantages, security improvements, and cost benefits in information technology (IT) areas...
 
Ratt

Ratt

New Member
#25
What Shinma said.

Although you won't be ocing, the i5 2500K comes equipped with better integrated graphics.
HD3000 = 12 Execution units vs HD2000 = 6 Execution Units

Yes, that's the idea behind integrated graphics. 128MB with Dynamically shared memory up to 1.7GB. Some 3D games will have trouble with it since it can only detect 128MB of memory. Not a problem if you are not into games.
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#26
No, am absolutely not a gamer. I have a blast recording my own music with Audacity and Cake Walk Sonar. I also edit photos and recode video and such.

So the K sounds like the proper choice. Will the bios auto detect the multiplier upon boot or will I have to manually set it on the first fire-up?

Sorry for all the Qs, guys. I'm just way out of touch with the newer stuff.
 
Shinma

Shinma

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#27
Absolutely no need to apologize.
Considering the frequency of changes by both AMD and Intel, matter of months instead of years now...
It's enough to give anyone a headache.
And that's those actually keeping track! :)

For recent mobos the multiplier should be detected but if it does not,
There is always the option of manually setting it to x33.

Good idea to check the mobo website for any BIOS issues/updates.

EDIT: Just checked ASUS website, only the initial 0401 BIOS listed.
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#28
Absolutely no need to apologize.
Considering the frequency of changes by both AMD and Intel, matter of months instead of years now...
It's enough to give anyone a headache.
And that's those actually keeping track! :)

For recent mobos the multiplier should be detected but if it does not,
There is always the option of manually setting it to x33.

Good idea to check the mobo website for any BIOS issues/updates.

EDIT: Just checked ASUS website, only the initial 0401 BIOS listed.
Well, I appreciate the education! Is there an advantage one way or the other as to using the on-die vid as opposed to a separate video card? The way I look at it is that the fewer pieces you put in there the less power it will consume and the cooler it should run.


Also, is the stock cooler really enough or is something better?
 
Shinma

Shinma

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#29
Separate video card would definitely be a good idea, since it would free up the system memory.

Following contains charts, LINK

General consensus appears to be that it beats out the weakest discrete graphics cards, like HD 5450 and similar.
However, when compared $60.00? video cards, GT 240/HD 5550 and up, it gets trounced.

The stock cooler should suffice but there are plenty of inexpensive after market coolers available.
They will have lower noise levels and still beat the stock in cooling performance.
Grab one when/if you can get them on sale...
e.g. Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus, Corsair A50...
Not exactly sure about the noise level/characteristics of the A50 but sale price at $20.01.
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#30
Okay, just a couple more ;)

I have an HD 4800 series. I have a much better one too but it overheats like mad so I pulled it. 4800 or on-die?

Also, 32 or 64 bit OS? Are most apps 64 bit compatible these days, audacity, photoshop elements 7, etc.? I have 32 and 64 bit Win 7. I have not used Win 7 yet so I have no idea.
 
Shinma

Shinma

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#31
No contest, the HD 4800 series.
I installed an Arctic Cooling after market cooler for my HD 4830.

In terms of hardware,
If intending to use in excess of 4 GB, dual channel: 64-bit operating system.

In terms of software,
Better check first.
Since I transcode and such... frequently, to avoid any hit in performance,
Still using WindowsXP 32-bit with 4 GB dual channel.

There is a chart floating around where someone tested a WinXP 32-bit along a Win7 64-bit with same hardware in a video editing/transcoding? environment.

I haven't fiddled around with Win7 64-bit since RC and initial public sale.
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#32
I was going to use 8 gigs of ram, and I understand that a 32 bit system does not register more than 4 gigs, but will it still use it?
 
Shinma

Shinma

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#33
Actually even with 4 GB of memory on a 32-bit OS, depending on mobo design, only 3.25 GB - 3.5 GB would be used.
My current GIGABYTE only registers 3.25 GB.

Here's another annoyance,
A 64-bit operating system may use all the 8 GB for more
but
Depending on the video editing/transcoding software,
It may coded to use only up to 2 GB! :mad:
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#34
Wow, now I'm really confused. Well, nopt confused, but rather undecided as to what OS to use. Someone told me a while back that the ram is used in the 32 bit system but it doesn't show up. But then someone else told me that it won't even use the 4 gigs, and will only use what is shown at post.

I would think that photoshop, being multiprocessor happy, would use all available ram. Other software I use may not. I use AVS video converter, AVS editor, etc. I could use some better software, I suppose.
 
Shinma

Shinma

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#35
I usually use AVStoDVD. :)
ConvertXtoDVD used to be my primary DVD authoring software but no longer.
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#36
Well, I'll have to check all my software and make sure it's 64 bit compatible. I've got as ton of proggys installed now and hope that most of them will work. I love RegSupreme, Malwarebytes and CCleaner. Hopefully the AVS vid stuff will work. I don't see much sense in using 8gigs of ram if I can only use a tad over 3 gigs of it. I'd like to use it all so it looks like 64 bit is the way to go.
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#37
Actually even with 4 GB of memory on a 32-bit OS, depending on mobo design, only 3.25 GB - 3.5 GB would be used.
My current GIGABYTE only registers 3.25 GB.

Here's another annoyance,
A 64-bit operating system may use all the 8 GB for more
but
Depending on the video editing/transcoding software,
It may coded to use only up to 2 GB! :mad:

HERE is something interesting!
 
Ratt

Ratt

New Member
#38
If you are undecided, then why don't you just install both WinXP 32 and Win7 64 for a dual boot system?

Although the software backwards compatibility for Win7 64 is excellent, for software from year 2000 and above, WinXP 32 will run older programs.

The good news is that all the drivers needed for the ASUS P8Z68-V LE to run WinXP 32 is available. The bit difficult part is trying to install the os, because you can't use a standard windows install disk. It won't detect the SATA hard drives.

Instead you must you nLite software to slipstream the service packs and copy the sata drivers necessary to detect the HDD. There's a lot of good easy to follow guides available on the net.

I recommend practicing on an unused hard disk drive. Create 2 partitions on a HDD for WinXP 32 and Win7 64 or install WinXP 32 & Win7 64 on a separate drive.
 
The*Q*

The*Q*

Been Around A While!
#39
If you are undecided, then why don't you just install both WinXP 32 and Win7 64 for a dual boot system?

Although the software backwards compatibility for Win7 64 is excellent, for software from year 2000 and above, WinXP 32 will run older programs.

The good news is that all the drivers needed for the ASUS P8Z68-V LE to run WinXP 32 is available. The bit difficult part is trying to install the os, because you can't use a standard windows install disk. It won't detect the SATA hard drives.

Instead you must you nLite software to slipstream the service packs and copy the sata drivers necessary to detect the HDD. There's a lot of good easy to follow guides available on the net.

I recommend practicing on an unused hard disk drive. Create 2 partitions on a HDD for WinXP 32 and Win7 64 or install WinXP 32 & Win7 64 on a separate drive.

Great ideas here! But, I think I'm just gonna go the win 7 x64 route. I checked all the crucial apps and they are compatible. Anything older than that is not necessary. I'm going to go with the i5-2500K, the ASUS P8Z68-V LE , and 8 gigs of G.SKILL Ripjaws Series. That should make a pretty solid system. I'll install my HD 4800 series vid card too.
 

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