[RESOLVED] LAN speed

vinc_eko

vinc_eko

New Member
#1
Hi guys,
all i know about LAN (local area network) speed is : when we want to reach 1Gb speed we have to fit the requirements such as : cable cat6, LAN card & switch both support for Gigabyte.
Once, in my place, i use the cable cat 5 and then plug in my notebook (LAN card support for Gigabyte) and the switch also support for the Gigabyte too (Switch HP Procurve), then i check my speed connection is : 1Gbps.
How come?
So, can i assume, with using only two things : LAN card & switch that both supported for Gigabyte, i can simply reach the 1Gbps speed commection?

Need your info..
Thx a lot
 
equinoxe3d

equinoxe3d

Active Member
#2
Not entirely sure, somebody correct me if I'm wrong on that: I think standard Cat 5e network cable is fine for 1Gb as long as the distance is not excessive.
Cat 6 is "certified" for use with 1Gb, but was (is?) more expensive.
 
glussier

glussier

New Member
#3
For 1000 base-t you are good to go for 100 meter with cat 5, cat 5e and cat 6
For 1000 base-tx you need cat 6.

The difference between 1000 base-t and 1000 base-tx is that 1000 base-t can only transfer at that speed in 1 direction at a time. 1000-tx uses all 4 wires to transfer 1000mb in both directions at the same time.

With cat 6 cable, you could go up to 10gb @ 100 meters no problem. The new draft cat 7 will let you go up to 100gb.

Conclusion: No problem using cat 5 or cat 5e on a home network 1gb connexion.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#4
A side question:

To achieve gigabit speed, is it necessary to have every device in the entire system capable of gigabit, or only the devices active in a given transfer? In other words would a computer capable of only 100Mb connected to a network but not in use in a data transfer prevent other devices in the network from running at gigabit if they were all gigabit capable?
 
vinc_eko

vinc_eko

New Member
#6
@all, thanks guys, for giving your explanation. Now i know. In fact, since i just want to achieve 1Gb, without concern in others thing, except the budget, i can simply use my cat5 cable, coz it's much cheaper :)

Also, special thanks to equinoxe3d and glussier, for the detail information.

All clear now :)
 
glussier

glussier

New Member
#8
A side question:

To achieve gigabit speed, is it necessary to have every device in the entire system capable of gigabit, or only the devices active in a given transfer? In other words would a computer capable of only 100Mb connected to a network but not in use in a data transfer prevent other devices in the network from running at gigabit if they were all gigabit capable?


If the 100mbit device is not used in the same transfer, it would not effect the speed of the gigabit devices.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#10
Thanks Shinma. I read your linked article and it confirms Gilles answer in detail:

I delayed the start of the transfer to the 100 Mbps receiver for 5 seconds to test whether the connected, but inactive 100 Mbps receiver would affect the transfer between the gigabit transmitter and receiver. Obviously, it does not. It's only when the transfer starts to the 100 Mbps receiver that the sender throttles back its speed to near 100 Mbps speeds.