[RESOLVED] Daisy chaining a wireless router to a wired router?

Flash

Flash

Member
#1
How do I connect a wireless router to a wired router?

I want to keep my home computers wired but, I need a wireless router for a "ROKU".
 
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Shinma

Shinma

____________
#2
If you're asking just what you need for the physical connection,
Just use a CAT5E or CAT6 cable to connect one directly to the other.

If you're asking the entire process involved,
Presuming that your primary access point, device that will handle DHCP, is the wired router,
You will need to make the wireless router into a secondary access point.

First step is to verify that the wireless router even has the capability to act as a secondary access point
since not all can function as such.
You can check the wireless router manufacturer's website to see if it can function as such.

For some general idea of configuring a wireless router into a secondary access point,
You can take a look at the following tutorial/link,

If you have not purchased a wireless router already,
You can just purchase a wireless access point, to avoid configuration headache.
 
Flash

Flash

Member
#3
I ordered an inexpensive ($20) TP- Link router.
I will have to experiment when I get it.

Anyway, this will be my very first experience with wireless routers.
Will I have to first configure the wireless?
 
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Flash

Flash

Member
#4
I think I got it. :)

BTW saying that I need to configure an "access point" clears up a lot for me.
I now have an idea of what I have to do.
Thanks. :)

In any event, the ROKU will be delivered today and the router tomorrow.
 
Shinma

Shinma

____________
#5
Oke, doke.

You may want to check to see if the TP-Link can handle third party firmware.
e.g. DD-WRT, Tomato...
Just an additional option if the default TP-Link firmware is limited.
 
Flash

Flash

Member
#6
OK..."dumb" question.......
Forgive my ignorance but.....

Since I got a wired router, why can't I just feed one of the LAN jacks of the wired router into the internet jack of the wireless router? The wired router was just P&P and works flawlessly with absolutely no configuration needed.
Then configure the wireless router like that.

Wont the wireless router view it as just a regular modem output ?

None of my computers, etc are networked, they just share the net connection from the router .
 
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Shinma

Shinma

____________
#7
If I understood your question correctly,
The issue is that all consumer oriented routers, wireless and wired, by default, enables DHCP.
So in your described scenario,
You would end up with both the wired and wireless routers attempting to send out IPs to your devices.

Flash said:
...None of my computers, etc are networked, they just share the net connection from the router .
The very fact that devices are connected to a router, that is an example of a "network".
Networking is where devices share a resource.
Currently, your devices (computers) may not be sharing any files, printers or such with each other
but
Your devices are currently "sharing" an internet connection,
Which is currently facilitated by your "wired" router.

For additional details, click on the link below.
 
Shinma

Shinma

____________
#9
You would disable the DHCP in the secondary access point, your wireless router.
In that scenario,
Only your wired router would be issuing IPs, so no conflicts.

The tutorial/example is only for the D-Link model.
The exact process will differ since each manufacturer/model implements the user interface differently.

What is the model of the TP-Link wireless router that you intend to use?
Have you verified that it can act as a secondary access point?
 
Shinma

Shinma

____________
#10
In your situation,
To prevent any signal loss, bandwidth and such,
Is it feasible to run a network cable (CAT5E or CAT6) from your wired router to your new wireless router?

Additional information,
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#13
Just checking here, but you do know that most standard wireless routers will have four wired outputs as well as the wireless signal. But if those are not enough, or if you have an access point that has no wired outputs, you can follow Shinma's suggestions to link the routers.

One other suggestion to confuse you. If you ever need to connect two networking devices with a crossover cable, an ethernet cable with two of the wires crossed from the standard alignment, and you need a long cable, you can make a long crossover cable by using a short crossover cable connected to a long standard cable with a female to female connector. Bit of trivia in case you ever need it.
 
Flash

Flash

Member
#15
I got it all working as it should.
It was actually pretty simple once I knew what I had to do.

Thanks for the help. :)
 
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Flash

Flash

Member
#17
One more question....
Forgive my ignorance but, this is my first experience with wireless.

Since the wireless is an access point and it does not have a password, is this a problem?
Is it anything to be concerned about ?
 
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Shinma

Shinma

____________
#18
Always a good idea to have a password for wireless.

Since the primary access point does not have wireless feature/password,
You can try and set up a password on the secondary access point and test.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#19
Experts say the best security for wireless is a long password. To make it tough on hackers but easy on you, choose a long difficult one, but write it on a piece of tape attached to the bottom of the router or access point. The outside world can't see it, but you can find it when you need it.
 
Flash

Flash

Member
#20
OK

Would adding a PW also effect the lan ports on the (access point) router or, only the wi-fi?
 
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