Peer to peer configuration Problems

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crackerboy

New Member
#1
I just set up two PC's with fresh win98 OS's. I then installed two Identical kingston kne30bt combo cards that 98 picked up without a problem. I read the new articles posted in this column about setting up a peer to peer network, made a cross-over cable and connected them. I configured the network per the articles suggestions. After logging on and double-clicking on the net neighborhood icon, then the entire network icon i get a "unable to access network" message. What Now?? I have ensured that both PC's are clients and have unique IP's and are set to share hard drives. Now one PC "sees" itself on the network but the other one is still unable to access the network. Both link LED's are on and both act LED's blink randomly. I can't think of anything else. Thanks for any insight you provide.
 
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Eccentric

New Member
#2
Network Neighborhood uses NetBEUI names to identify machines. Make sure that NetBEUI is installed, and it has a name defined under Identification. However, first check and see if you can ping the other IP, from a DOS prompt. If you can, then above is your problem. If you can't then there is still a problem with your protocols or your connection.

[This message has been edited by Eccentric (edited 02-18-99).]
 
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crackerboy

New Member
#3
Thanks Eccentric...
Forgive my ignorance about this subject but just how would I ping the other IP from my DOS prompt?? Also, I want to learn more about networking for the purpose of setting up gaming LAN's as well as for other applications. What is a good place to start. Do you have any publications or websites to recommend. Thanks again.
 
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Eccentric

New Member
#4
At the dos prompt type:

ping <IP address>

Replace <IP address> with the IP address you gave the other machine. After you ping it it will start printing out a list of packet received, and the roundtrip time. This represents how long it takes for your machine to send a packet to the other, plus how ong that machine takes to read it and respond.
General networking books are hard to find because with each protocol you have to set them up differently. You should start with the hardware side. If you can find any Cisco publications you learn alot. The TCP/IP MCSE preparation book is good, it goes into how to set TCP/IP networks up, only on Windows however.
 
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aab101

New Member
#5
Hi--I had a problem with your exact symptoms. Here's what fixed my problem: go into the Control Panel/System/Device Manager/System Devices/PCI Bus & disable IRQ steering (3rd tab). This is a recently new technology that allows different PCI cards to share IRQs; however, it causes problems with certain PCI cards. Here's a good website you might also check out if this doesn't work (it's where I found this fix):
http://www.helmig.com/
Good luck!
Note: To ping another machine go to a DOS prompt & type: "ping 192.168.1.1" but insert the IP number of the other machine in place of this example. If it "sees" this machine, it will note a reply.
 
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crackerboy

New Member
#6
THANKS!
I'll try pinging them tonight. I'll look into Cisco pubs too. Thanks for the website and device manager tips as well. I'll post what I see happen
 
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crackerboy

New Member
#7
This is what I got. I tried to ping the other PC but got nothing. I then checked to see if I had netBEUI installed and Bingo it wasn't there. I installed that on both machines then set netBEUI as default protocol. Restarted and pinged again. This time I got 1ms ping times with no loss. Looks like it worked!! Thanks for all the good advice everyone. I'm sure I'll be around
 

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