Partitioning progarm that allows resizing existing partitioins w/ a UEFI BIOS

V

videobruce

New Member
#1
Existing HDD with three partitions (one active) from a conventional BIOS to a UEFI based BIOS
The 1st partition is only 10GB. I want to double it for Win7 (no games, non O/S files are stored outside the active partition. I don't need any more room). The 2nd & 3rd are storage that I want to keep. The extra 10GB would come from the 2nd partition.

Switching from a conventional BIOS to UHCI, is that any problem for non active partitions as far as loosing data and having accessibility?

I have been using EaseUS & Partition Manager, but neither will allow me to resize an existing HDD's partition without wiping the entire drive. I haven't tried GParted yet.

I'm looking for a program that I can boot from. Input?

(I hope that made sense, ask if it didn't)
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#4
I merged two partitions while preserving a third with data, but it was on a conventional bios, no UEFI. I think I used Gparted, probably from a live linux distro. It's been a while.
 
V

videobruce

New Member
#5
I just tried GPartedLive and there is no merge option, at least not visible unless it is some hidden process. It seems the 'merge' function is a pay only feature by design to get you to step up to the 'pay' version.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#6
I just tried GPartedLive and there is no merge option, at least not visible unless it is some hidden process. It seems the 'merge' function is a pay only feature by design to get you to step up to the 'pay' version.
I didn't merge. I probably deleted the two partitions, then created one new one out of the unallocated space.
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#9
The boot partition still needs to be MBR for Win7. Minitool supports GPT.

Why do you have to use GPT? You'd only need that for partitions larger than 2TB.
 
V

videobruce

New Member
#12
Ok, now I'm confused. I was under the impression this new & greatest UEFI BIOS with it's AHCI mode was all about not using MBR (except for that somewhat hidden extra partitions Win7 creates) and switching over to GPT.
How outdated a conventional BIOS is, same goes for MBR with partition size, latly AHCI being more efficient.


My situation;
1. Existing 1 TB HDD; partitioned 10 GB XP, 600 GB media, 300GB program, photo & document storage.
2. Increase the 1st partition to 20-25GB from the 2nd partiton (resize & merge),
3. Load Win7 in the first,
4. Retain the 2nd & 3rd partitions without loosing data (it is backed up elsewhere).
5. Save a image of 'C' to install a mirror O/S on a SSD.

Sounds like a new thread is is order.
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#13
If the partition is less than 2TB, you don't need to use GPT. You can still use AHCI with MBR.
 
V

videobruce

New Member
#14
I understand that, but a GPT is suppose to be effective and/or effective with Win7 and above isn't it?
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#18
Yes there is a hidden partition created, but that doesn't mean the boot partition can be GPT.

I've had to revert several Win8 systems to Win7. In most cases, I've had to disable secure boot and enable legacy mode, then revert the hard drive from GPT to MBR (or wipe the drive).
 
V

videobruce

New Member
#19
This still has not be answered:
My situation;
1. Existing 1 TB HDD; partitioned 10 GB XP, 600 GB media, 300GB program, photo & document storage.
2. Increase the 1st partition to 20-25GB from the 2nd partiton (resize & merge),
3. Load Win7 in the first,
4. Retain the 2nd & 3rd partitions without loosing data (it is backed up elsewhere).
5. Save a image of 'C' to install a mirror O/S on a SSD.
If I install Win7 in the 1st partition replacing XP, how does that affect the other partitions? Also, where/when is the choice of MBR and GPT enter into this?
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#20
Besides the need to increase the partition size, going from XP to Win7 shouldn't affect the other partitions.

There isn't a choice during the Win7 setup. I'm not sure what you're asking.
 

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