New tire design NO AIR!

F

F_A_L_C_O_N

New Member
#21
Bink said:
... The radial structure, on the other hand, is designed to last as long as your vehicle itself ....
well as long as one does not try to race with it in Indianapolis :D
 
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krupted

krupted

New Member
#22
thanks bink, i was looking for a link, now it changes what i think

i thought it was spring steel, but fiberglass, wow. actually, its very practical, it must be one hell of a resin used in the glass but if that is all glass and rubber than its probably cheap to produce. fiberglass does not really wear out unless over extended, so by judging the way the designed it, it looks pretty ingenious.

but still, i wonder how it performs when snow gets packed in there, freeze the whole thing solid and then you drive off and hit a nice pothole haha, cold enough weather and i bet that thing shatters
 
fire

fire

computer guy
#23
I want to see this tested in Winnipeg, Canada where I live. -30C with out the windchill, snow and so forth. Dont think so.
 
krupted

krupted

New Member
#24
thats what im saying, fiberglass is extremely strong and extremely flexible, but still no comparison to vulcanized rubber for applications in cold weather. well maybe they can prove me wrong, it wont take too long to find out- if theyre really that great youll see them around. and i still doubt theyre as soft as rubber tires, fine for racing but 90% of drivers want the smoothest softest ride possible
 
ThreeOnTheTree

ThreeOnTheTree

New Member
#25
Looks pretty nice. I'd imagine they'd have a decent amount of lateral strength, maybe more than air tires, which depend entirely on sidewall strength in turns. What I wonder about is ride quality and long term durability, not to mention what what would happen if you drove through mud or over a gravel surface. They aren't a sealed unit like a "normal" tire. However, they could probably close in the sides so that it looks like a normal tire and to better protect the guts from accumulating junk. Not sure if heat would be an issue then, though.
 
Martin_89

Martin_89

New Member
#26
the problem is though it looks crap imo. it takes the look off the wheels and makes them look tiny, well they are tiny.
 
pcpal

pcpal

New Member
#27
There are already some tires out like that but with air. If it goes flat you can drive on it up to fifty miles. There on the newer Mercedes and higher end cars. I saw it on the Discovery channel and I wish I had four of them. They don't blow out it just loses air. No more stuck in the middle of nowhere.
 
ThreeOnTheTree

ThreeOnTheTree

New Member
#28
Those are called run-flat tires. You can get them from goodyear, maybe others. Cars like the Corvette have them so they don't have to put a spare in the vehicle.
 
Hoyle

Hoyle

New Member
#30
Tests show it will outlast the average car, Laurent said, leaving just the outer treads to be replaced periodically.
This will be the real determining factor. I think the pros are simple:

1) No flats
2) They are saying that you can retread them - so they'll last a LONG time
3) They SHOULD corner well
4) They should withstand more abuse than air tires (You know what I mean if you have lived in the east coast of the US - where roads are frost-heaved anually and only paved every few decades. I've several times now driven over bumps or potholes and simply had my tires break the bead and fall off the rim.)

But... I do wonder. Composite is great stuff... but it's NOT forgiving. When you do over-stress it - running over a branch or something, it could very well take damage that won't show immediately, but which could become very hazardous 20-30,000 KM down the road.

Still, if they've designed enough extra strength into it, this might not be a real problem.

I do hope they put a protective side-wall on, though.
 
krupted

krupted

New Member
#31
Hoyle said:
But... I do wonder. Composite is great stuff... but it's NOT forgiving. When you do over-stress it - running over a branch or something, it could very well take damage that won't show immediately, but which could become very hazardous 20-30,000 KM down the road.
rubber air tires have the same problem so thats really not an issue. belts can break without notice, and sidewalls are very thin. amazing how well they do hold up

i still think these airless tires will have trouble in the winter. they better have some sort of super resin to hold up when its -40F
 
Hoyle

Hoyle

New Member
#32
Well, rubber tires ARE vulnerable (probably more so than these things). However, when you hit a branch or whatever with a rubber tire it pretty much gives up right away. My experience with composites (boatbuilding, bowmaking, architectural prototyping) are that they can be fundametally failed, but not show it for a while. So I'm wondering if you could hit a branch, and a few thousand miles later have a dozen of those composite 'spokes' go out in a turn and flip you over.

Probably, they've done all sorts of testing - and probably even if these have a 'problem' like this they are still much better than rubber... but I think I'll wait for some real-world testings before I buy them. I do hope they work out, though!
 
krupted

krupted

New Member
#33
rubber tires are very weak, or should i say extrememly strong for rubber, but in its application its amazing they work at all.

im also betting there is some redundancy in that design, im sure a few skopes can go and the wheel will still hold shape. least until you get to a shop. i bet you would feel it, it would either feel bumpy or at high speed the balace would be off
 
wonderinguy34

wonderinguy34

Restless Nocturne
#35
I would think as a spare tire it would be great ,small/light weight .I was also reading in a tirebusiness flyer that they would be used in "stair climbing " wheel chairs .I imagine their would be other uses other than cars/trucks ,even though the article stated it would meet truck load carrying requirements.
 
krupted

krupted

New Member
#38
why? it shouldnt cost anything near what it costs to make tires. has anyone seen how tires are made? the process is daunting, very slow too. the cost is very high, mainly because rubber is very expensive. (costly to grow and harvest, must be harvested by hand)

these seem like all fiberglass and metal with a rubber pad on them. fiberglass is basically free, and somewhat easy to work with. i would think (after inital startup costs) these things would be a bit cheaper.


edit- ok cheaper to produce, but if they can sell it as a lifetime tire, cha ching$$:D
 

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