New tire design NO AIR!

F

F_A_L_C_O_N

New Member
#7
I am just wondering how this kind of tyres affect the drive.

I mean you wouldnt wanna have cars skidding of the road on every corner.

Especially here in Europe where we actually need cars that can do the corner ;)
 
CenturionStrategy

CenturionStrategy

Super Moderator
#10
Probably quite good in a straight line, but I think there would be a hell of a lot of flex when you corner which would have to be sorted.

Seen it before, but great idea :)
 
Admin

Admin

Administrator
Staff member
#11
Well it depends on the shape of those spokes. They may be sufficiently wide that they only flex in 1 direction
 
flat-v8

flat-v8

New Member
#12
Found another pic of the car turning, I'm sure they are being well tested for skids, high speed turning, and of course drag strip burn outs!
 

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CenturionStrategy

CenturionStrategy

Super Moderator
#13
Wow, I take it back then. He seems to be cornering at some speed there and they seem to be taking it well :eek:
 
Admin

Admin

Administrator
Staff member
#14
Yeah the spokes are like the width of the wheel, but thin the other way. They should only flex in one direction.
 
Admin

Admin

Administrator
Staff member
#15
I'm tellin' ya, just seeing these almost makes me wish I still had or needed a car!
 
F

F_A_L_C_O_N

New Member
#16
Ponch said:
a bit of wind, a fallen branch and clack clack clack you go. :D
and how long when kids realize this as well ;)

Otherwise yeah it does look interesting, but I sure would wait for say a year or two before considering them, after they get out.
It takes this much for public to discover, for example, at 180km/h on a freeway, in the rain, driving on a "truck" lane where asphalt is not exactly level anymore, you go straight out ;)

And honestly trusting company selling the product to test the product or "independent instute" to do that for them is about as smart as asking the the guy at the fruit stand if the fruit is fresh ;)

Anyone remember Firestone incident.
 
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edhe62

edhe62

New Member
#17
I agree with you that waiting would be a good idea. But, take a look at the photo of the car turning and take a close look at the front left tire and how it's flattened out (increasing the footprint). That increased contact area with the road would give greatly improved traction to the tires compared to todays standard construction! Conversely though, it would give greater lift area in wet conditions making hydroplaning a real threat.
 
Martin_89

Martin_89

New Member
#18
I think if the price is right then it’s a good idea. It’s going to eliminate blow outs and flat tyres.
 
krupted

krupted

New Member
#19
well no matter what, theyre gonna be a stiffer harder ride than rubber/pressureized air. Although maybe this technology is ok for today's much smoother suspensions. I doubt theyll be cheap, it doesnt look like you can just replace the tread, and that may very well be because the spokes wear out just as fast, as all spring steel does
 
Bink

Bink

Will moderate for food
#20
Michelin Unveils Airless Fiberglass Tyre

Michelin have unveiled a series of new tyre developments for this years Paris Motor Show including an airless tyre laced with fibreglass...

...The Michelin Airless tyre is being promoted as a maintenance free and puncture-proof tyre, that does not require inflating, labelled by Michelin as a “fly trap*”, a radial structure made of high-performance composite materials on which a rubber tread is bonded.

The tyre is made from 115 rings of tough resin laced with glass fibre and remains roadworthy even when shot with a rifle. Tests show it will outlast the average car, Laurent said, leaving just the outer treads to be replaced periodically. No date has yet been set for its commercial launch...

...According to a Michelin, “when in due course the tread wears down, all you need do is have it re-treaded. The radial structure, on the other hand, is designed to last as long as your vehicle itself. Michelin Airless is very well adapted not only to passenger cars but also to two-wheel vehicles”...

...The tyre operates with a maximum safe speed of 270 kilometers per hour (170 miles per hour) with the prototype performing similarly to inflatable tires - with important differences.
 

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