new CPU HSF

Martin_89

Martin_89

New Member
#1
well im thinking about getting a new CPU HSF for my barton 2500 when i get it soon. so what do you recomend, low noise is a MUST and low price would be a bonus looking for good cooling though as im an overcker. one thing though it must come with a thermal pad or paste applyed as i just cant do this, i know that sounds weird but i just cant lol.

looking at THIS coolermaster HSF with 80MM Fan but im not sure if 29DBA is quiet?

 
SaulTurnedPaul

SaulTurnedPaul

Hiking Member
#3
The ceramique stuff is much easier to apply than most - perhaps you'd be fine with that?

I'd recommend the SLK800 with a 92mm fan. Friend's got one and loves it to death.
 
oORyanOo

oORyanOo

New Member
#4
Be sure to factor in whether you want a quiet fan, something normal, or a performance fan like the Tornado
 
Martin_89

Martin_89

New Member
#5
well im just useless at applying the paste.

well i definately want silent, or at least quiet but id like some performance.
 
wrathchild_67

wrathchild_67

Hidden Member
#6
It's easy, start with just a speck of paste and dab it on the core with your finger (make sure you wash your hands thoroughly first to minimize oils from your skin getting into the mix). As you progress and keep holding it to the light, you'll see tiny areas of exposed core shining back. Continue doing this until you can no longer see a shine from the core when holding it to the light. This ensures an even distribution of paste, complete coverage of the core, and a minimal amount of paste is used.
 
SaulTurnedPaul

SaulTurnedPaul

Hiking Member
#7
Originally posted by wrathchild_67
It's easy, start with just a speck of paste and dab it on the core with your finger (make sure you wash your hands thoroughly first to minimize oils from your skin getting into the mix). As you progress and keep holding it to the light, you'll see tiny areas of exposed core shining back. Continue doing this until you can no longer see a shine from the core when holding it to the light. This ensures an even distribution of paste, complete coverage of the core, and a minimal amount of paste is used.
I tend to fancy an old floppy's metal clip, myself. ;)
 
Martin_89

Martin_89

New Member
#8
awrite, the coolermaster stuff i had came with a little card and told me to apply it to the heatsink, so os it best to do it on the core?
 
wrathchild_67

wrathchild_67

Hidden Member
#9
The only paste I've ever had to apply to the heatsink is Nanotherm PCM+. It's basically a liquid that dries into a waxy substance. You also have to put it on the core as well. If the coolermaster stuff is just regular paste, you can get by putting it only on the core.

For the Nanotherm, I use the included 'spatula' because I don't want to touch the stuff. But with pastes, using your finger to apply it is fine. Just make sure to have paper towels around.
 
W

wetling

See my Sig
#10
Originally posted by wrathchild_67
It's easy, start with just a speck of paste and dab it on the core with your finger (make sure you wash your hands thoroughly first to minimize oils from your skin getting into the mix). As you progress and keep holding it to the light, you'll see tiny areas of exposed core shining back. Continue doing this until you can no longer see a shine from the core when holding it to the light. This ensures an even distribution of paste, complete coverage of the core, and a minimal amount of paste is used.
This seems like a terrible idea to me.

Martin, applying thermal paste isn't hard. I use a razor blade or credit card.
 
agw_01

agw_01

Modified Member
#11
I have a Thermalright SK-6+ with an 80mm YS-Tech Silent fan. The fins on my SK-6+ have been spread out, so that they are the right size for the fan.

With the low amount of airflow through my case (all fans on 7v), my temps are 40ºc idle and 47ºc full load. This is in a mildly warm room with the side panels on.

I would recommend the SLK-800 or 900, I'm definately going to get a 900 eventually, although the SK-7 can be had for dirt cheap on OcUK. Thermalright know how to make great heatsinks... my SK-6+ is a prime example... It's cooling a Barton 2500 @ 2.1GHz (pretty crap OC) :D

Oh, to spread thermal paste, I either use a flat-headed screwdriver or the heatsink from one of my Voodoo3 3000's.
 
wrathchild_67

wrathchild_67

Hidden Member
#12
Originally posted by wetling
This seems like a terrible idea to me.

Martin, applying thermal paste isn't hard. I use a razor blade or credit card.
You obviously haven't done it then.
 
agw_01

agw_01

Modified Member
#13
Well it isn't exactly difficult, it's just messy. It can also have terrible end results if you use Arctic Silver and don't notice any spillage's :D
 
W

wetling

See my Sig
#14
Originally posted by wrathchild_67
You obviously haven't done it then.
Nope, I prefer to do it right. :)

Clean the mating surfaces completely with a low residual solvent (High-purity isopropyl alcohol or acetone will work) and a LINT FREE cloth. (i.e. lens cleaning cloth) If another thermal compound has previously been applied to the heatsink, the mounting surface should be thoroughly scrubbed and cleaned with a xylene based cleaner, (Goof Off and some carburetor cleaners) acetone, mineral spirits, or 99% pure isopropyl alcohol. It is important to keep the surfaces free of foreign materials and NOT to touch the surfaces (a hair, piece of lint, and even dead skin cells can significantly affect the thermal interfaces performance, especially on modern small core CPUs as the surface area is already severely limited). In addition, oils from your fingers can adversely affect the performance by preventing the micronized silver fill from directly contacting the metal surface. (Fingerprints can be as thick as 0.005")

Directions
 
wrathchild_67

wrathchild_67

Hidden Member
#15
Funny, my way works just fine and it gives me lower temps than what would be expected (especially when compared to hsf and past reviews online). Don't talk out your ass unless you've tried it and can say it doesn't work.
 
Martin_89

Martin_89

New Member
#16
well ill give it a try the coolermaster stuff came with a kind of credit card thing to help apply.
 
W

wetling

See my Sig
#17
Originally posted by wrathchild_67
Funny, my way works just fine and it gives me lower temps than what would be expected (especially when compared to hsf and past reviews online). Don't talk out your ass unless you've tried it and can say it doesn't work.
Jeez man, don't get your panties in a bunch. There are a lot of things I haven't tried because the directions say not to.

Here is a short list of other directions I follow:

On Sears hairdryer:
Do not use while sleeping.

On some Swan frozen dinners:
Serving suggestion: Defrost.
(But it's *just* a suggestion!)

On Marks & Spencer Bread Pudding:
Product will be hot after heating.

On packaging for a Rowenta iron:
Do not iron clothes on body.

On an American Airlines packet of nuts:
Instructions: open packet, eat nuts.

On a Swedish chainsaw:
Do not attempt to stop chain with your hands or genitals.
 
wrathchild_67

wrathchild_67

Hidden Member
#18
There's a huge risk difference between stopping a chainsaw with your fingers and getting thermal paste on them.
 
W

wetling

See my Sig
#19
The directions tell you how to do it right. If you chose to do it wrong, I don't care. I don't think it's a good idea to teach people how to do things wrong.

If you tell them the right way, and how you do it and let them decide, that's okay.
 
wrathchild_67

wrathchild_67

Hidden Member
#20
Well this 'wrong' method allowed me to get to 3.6GHz. I think anyone's a jackass for calling someone's method wrong when a) you haven't tried it and b) you have no basis in fact that the method is wrong. There are different methods of applying paste and there are certainly wrong methods in which, wrong implies that the method does not work, is self defeating (time consuming or does the opposite of what was intended), or in some way damaging. My method is none of those, so you are incorrect here, or wrong as you say.
 

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