Linux Advice

jimbo1763

jimbo1763

Moderator
#1
I am very uneducated as to Linux.

I have an older (2005) HP laptop that has maxed out at 2GB of RAM. It originally came with XP, and that won't do any more, of course. I would like to try out Linux on it for routine stuff, primarily web surfing.

I am partial to the Chrome browser, for what it is worth.

What flavor of Linux would you suggest?
 
SpywareDr

SpywareDr

Member
#2
Zorin OS is a multi-functional operating system designed specifically newcomers to Linux. It is based on Ubuntu which is the most popular desktop Linux operating system in the world.

(I carry it on a little USB flash drive on my keychain).
 
SpywareDr

SpywareDr

Member
#4
Yep, Linux Mint 13 xfce is excellent for low powered machines and Mint Mate is also nice. I also carry Slax and Kali (BackTrack). There are hundreds of distros available. And experimenting with all the different flavors is a kick. :)
 
jimbo1763

jimbo1763

Moderator
#7
The old machine runs an AMD Turion chip at 1.6 GHz, together with 2 Gb of DDR RAM. Not great, but not bad. The old HP business machines last a long time, at least in my experience. They become obsolete technologically long before they give out.
 
Huge

Huge

Why am I still doing up?
#8
Shinma

Shinma

____________
#16
Found out tonight that Linux Lite does not like really looong file names.
Was moving a number of images from one hard drive to another and it took forever. Turned out that Aunt had numerous images she downloaded off the net and some of those uploaders wrote their entire poem as the bleepin' title!

EDIT: Upon further study of her hard drive, slowdown may have been due to the fact that she had over 25,000 images in just one folder.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#19
Windows 7 Enterprise will run on that hardware, especially with its 2G ram. I've used it on Pentium M 1.3 laptops with 1G and 1.5 G ram.

On linux, you'll hear a lot about Linux Mint. It's based on Ubuntu, which in turn is based on Debian. Originally it was distinguished by including all the media players and codecs rather than needing to install them separately. When Ubuntu developed the Unity desktop (think Win 8), many switched to Mint, which stuck with a conventional desktop. Currently for older hardware your best choices for Mint would be Mate, which uses a development of the older Gnome 2 desktop, or XFCE, known as a lightweight desktop. And I second the suggestion to download live cd versions and stick them on a usb flash drive. Playing around a little that way should tell you which you like best. The most likely areas for difficulty would be video display drivers and wireless drivers. Both are solvable for an install but might cause issues on a live disk. Some years ago I found Intel chipsets a slam dunk for live disks because of the lack of driver issues.

Another vote for Distrowatch for info, reviews and links.

And a mention again of Rufus for making bootable flash drives. When I last used it circa version 1.3.3, some versions had issues with some Win or linux distros. He's now up to ver 1.4.6 I see. When it works it's very quick and very easy.

Most linux distros can now read NTFS files.

Let us know how this works out for you.
 
Shinma

Shinma

____________
#20
Just a heads up,
CentOS does not natively support NTFS.
The NTFS-3G has to be manually installed via command line.
For that matter,
Just about everything has to be installed manually since it was originally intended for server use vs desktop use.
 

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