Knock down and rebuilding a house.

TaNG

TaNG

Moderator
#1
Hi everyone,

Just wondering if anyone has had any experience on this subject?

Cutting all the fine details, using a good reputable home builder. How long does it take to approximately knock down and rebuild?

I know that there are plenty of variables but... Ballpark? Any members here with experience in this area?

Thanks!
 
Steve R Jones

Steve R Jones

Administrator
#2
I don't have any direct experience...but I could guess that 2 to 6 months would balllpark it enough to drive you crazy.

As you mentioned - there are a ton of variables. Not all wrecking crews are equal. Not all builders are equal either.

Round here - the weather could play a major roll.
 
TaNG

TaNG

Moderator
#3
If it can be done in 6 months I would be a happy chap, but yes, those darn variables.

And yes, over here the weather could be one of those variables. It's one of those perfect Australian situations where we just gotta say 'see how ya go...'
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#4
Took about 7 months here in Vancouver, about 25 years ago. Reputable builder -- don't take the lowest bid.
 
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digitaldog

Still here!
#5
Thinking about it, when I used to work for a builder here in the UK it took an average of about 8 months, weather permitting. Try and get a price rather than a quote, quotes are flexible, a price should be fixed and check out the builders, ask around, try and find people who have used them and find out if they were happy with the end result, not easy if you are busy but could save some stress in the long run!

DD
 
TaNG

TaNG

Moderator
#6
Thanks for the tips! Definitely would go for a reputable builder, even if it means paying more. Last thing I want is crooked walls and unever floors!

About 8 months for a full tear down and rebuild is pretty impressive to me, of course the quicker the better but whenever I have people doing any sort of work for me I always make sure they know to not rush. That's one thing I m scared of, dodgy workmanship. I can't be there to do it myself, and even if I could be I wouldnt know what to do!
 
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digitaldog

Still here!
#7
I've worked for a few 'dodgy' builders in my time, to this day a rebuild, being completed during gale force winds, still only has wire holding the roof on! I said to the builder at the time, "the roof's lifting what do I do and his reply was; "get some thick wire, nail it to the rafters and then nail it to the walls, I'll be along later to render the walls and know-one will ever know"!!! Roof is still on today and that was ten years ago :D
 
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digitaldog

Still here!
#9
Here in the UK the most popular new build are timber framed houses. Timber frame, brick outer skin. These are built by contract price builders. If they go over the specified contract time they get charged £1,000 per day so 20 houses go up easily within 1 year, not great houses, bloody cold in winter but a house is a house. The biggest problem here, apart from our government is that we are 5,000,000 houses short but what with high house prices and expensive materials it's taking far too long to get these houses built! The other problem is legislation, to much of that. Two years ago I was working in London and in order to work on some building sites I needed a certificate that stated I could use a step ladder properly, without that piece of paper I wouldn't be allowed to work, it's all got a bit silly!

Back to your needs, try and use a builder with official qualifications, I don't know what a reputable builder needs in your part of the world but if you need to pay extra to get a professional in to do the job then you'll be a happy person at the end of it, you get what you pay for, if you pay peanuts you'll get monkeys! In other words, if it's too good to be true it probably is ;)
 
TaNG

TaNG

Moderator
#10
Same deal here, most houses in Australia are timber framed with brick skin.

I did hear that the hardest part about getting a house built is the whole getting everything approved by the authourities. How annoying.

Doesn't matter, will definitely go in with the advice of you get what you paid for.
 
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digitaldog

Still here!
#11
Yep, that can be the hardest part, getting permission! Here you battle with the planning authorities. It always amazes me the kind of structures that get passed when others don't, you wonder who is benefitting financially ;)
 
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digitaldog

Still here!
#13
Sometimes you do wonder! Take our local wind farm, the planners never came out to see the proposed site instead they asked the developer to do an assessment of the local conditions. He reported back to the planners that the only living thing within a three mile radius was sheep and they believed him. What he failed to mention was the three thousand people that also lived within three miles of the site, end result wind farm went up at a total cost of £1.3 million but the grant from Europe was worth £1.8 million, now I wonder where that extra money went and into whose pocket! ;)
 
TaNG

TaNG

Moderator
#14
That's easy. It went to reimburse the 3000 people who they had accidentally overlooked of course. Where else would it go? :p
 
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digitaldog

Still here!
#17
The delivery pigeon carrying my money must have got lost on the way, the wind farm was built 15 years ago but I live in hope ;)
 
TaNG

TaNG

Moderator
#18
Hahaha... Maybe it got blown away by all the wind.

I've decided not to rebuild for now. Maybe another 5 years or so, that'll give me more time to save. The less I borrow the better.

Let's talk about something else.
 
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digitaldog

Still here!
#20
Let's talk about something else.
So, how is life in Australia ? Is it like the UK I wonder, petrol up to £1.35 per litre, diesil up to £1.45 per litre, food costs soaring, energy prices sizzling, population putting money aside to cover winter bills, not going abroad for their summer hols, nearly a million young people out of work, 20 people chasing one job or are things better for you over there or anywhere for that matter ? (I'm not trying to be gloomy here, just realistic!) :)
 

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