how to block torrent

L

lizsmom

New Member
#1
My oldest daughter has decided to use a program called Torrent (sp?) Apparently you share files with this program. I am not familiar with this program but what I do know is that it is a bandwidth hog and I need to know how to block it.

I have a T1 (full speed 1.2 mb) and since she moved back in with this Torrent we are having serious connection issues. When playing UT3 ping is usually around 50-70 and from time to time it jumps to 900 and freezes. Not good. Also this morning I was working, downloading blueprints (86 mb file) the download just stopped.

How do I know it's her? We have a switch and it has lights for each connection. When any one connection is active it blinks and I've noticed that when these connection spikes happen her light is heavily lit. I will generally ask her if she is having problems or if she is playing a game and the reply is generally I'm doing homework and yes my connection is slow. The amazing thing is that at that moment the connection is freed up and back to normal.

Yes I could relieve her of all internet and trust me it has crossed my mind. I was wondering if there was another option.

While I'm asking what should I know about this Torrent thing?


Thanks
 
Leoslocks

Leoslocks

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
#2
Bit Torrent "BitTorrent is the global standard for accessing rich media over the Internet." Peer to peer, similar to the way Napster was to audio.
I would assume she is downloading movies. This might be better served in the Networking Forum. Perhaps there is a method of using the Router or Gateway to throttle her connection.
Interesting read on the HWC sidebar about throttling of BitTorrent transfers.
http://www.internetnews.com/bus-news/article.php/3737131
 
ThePerson98

ThePerson98

Active Member
#3
With most popular bitorrent clients you can limit bandwidth going in and out. If she is pirating (Teens are always pirating music, I'm in highschool and oh lord how often I hear "OH JUST DOWNLOAD THIS AND GO TO THIS WEBSITE AND ITS ALL FREE!") But see if her bitorrent client can limit connection speeds. Set upload speed to about 15 KB/sec and download to about 50 kb/sec and that might free a lot up.
I imagine she has no caps so it just flies up as high as possible.
 
L

lizsmom

New Member
#5
We have a T1 from FDN and they manage it. ( in case that helps)

What we have is very simple. 4 PC's all running Win Xp, they are not networked. We do not file or print share. There is a switch, netgear 5 port 10/100 MBPS Switch FS605 v3, One thing I have noticed is that even when her computer is off the light on the switch where she is plugged into is still lit. Her PC is the only one that does this, yes I've plugged in to a different port to verify it wasn't the light sticking.

thanks
 
Shinma

Shinma

____________
#6
lizsmom said:
... netgear 5 port 10/100 MBPS Switch FS605 v3 ...
That switch does not have any network management capabilities.
You will need additional hardware and/or software for network control capabilities.

lizsmom said:
... One thing I have noticed is that even when her computer is off the light on the switch where she is plugged into is still lit. Her PC is the only one that does this, yes I've plugged in to a different port to verify it wasn't the light sticking...
Not familiar with that switch
but
I would think that it/port should be lit if/when a system is connected to that port via ethernet cable.
 
G

Gradlock

New Member
#7
From a personal point of view I would just make her remove the darn program. Some ISPs will send you warnings if they notice too much bandwidth usage or even send you a notice of copyright infringement. It happened to me when my roommates stupidly decided they couldn't wait for a movie to come out on DVD and two days later we got a notice from the ISP of Copyright Violation. Fortunately it's usually a scare tactic for a single offense, which worked well for us, to get you to stop. If you continue to do it you might get your service cancelled or even taken to court by the RIAA and/or MPAA. Not a fan or either org
From a technical point of view I would do what ThePerson and Leo recommend of limiting her bandwidth somehow via the torrent client. Find out which program she's using. When I'm downloading a large file on one PC and playing online on another simultaneously my lag time increases a lot.
I have a Netgear switch and the lights on it stay on as well as long as there is a cable plugged into a port.
 
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L

lizsmom

New Member
#8
I plan on asking her to remove it now that I know what it is. Will she reinstall it? I'm not sure. I'd like to throttle her connection so it wouldn't be useful to have the program installed.

The switch #1 light is always on as it's the one the service is plugged into. 1-2& 3 go out whne the PC's are off. Her light will go out if I turn off the power to her PC but not if it's just off. The cables are always plugged in to the switch.

I had thought that this switch was not going to be helpful with this situation. We had a Netgear router that we used when we had cable, we tried using it with the T1 but the system would stop responding on a daily basis and we'd have to reset theT1 router in the garage. This was not a good thing so we purchased the switch. Apparently because we are on a managed T1 and are behind FDN's router setup we can not run another router, they called it double routing which is not good. I'm not a network person and do not pretend to be one so I really have no clue. I would like to have more freedom to controll certain things but not too sure of the best way to do so. It would be nice for hosting UT3 to be out from behind th
 
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Shinma

Shinma

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#9
If use of a router is out of the question,
You can consider using a smart switch such as the ASUS GigaX1024P.
Bandwidth control, traffic history, so you can trace source of traffic originating in your home...
 
ThePerson98

ThePerson98

Active Member
#10
If she is pirating, you need to go show her some articles of people who pirated and got caught, and remove the program, and watch to make sure she isnt using such a program anymore.

Pirating is serious, so if she's just havin' a good ol' time downloading "free" music, I highly doubt she's doing that in a legal way. The RIAA and MPAA, once they get their jaws on someone they don't let you go too easily, and they won't see some girl who's pirating that they're just gonna let run free, they're going to see that your IP was downloading illegally and you're in charge of that IP.
 
N

Nunchakulee

New Member
#11
Hello i have been wondering if there is any way to police and filter out unappropriate media and things that are not for children such as pornography in a bit torrent client? Even though my internet filter catches the categories and keywords for everything on the internet it doesn't catch the selected categories for torrent downloads. Any help would be appreciated.
 
Bink

Bink

Will moderate for food
#12
I recommend setting up an account with OpenDNS. The free option will be more than ample.

Once you've done that, you can then point your DNS settings to the OpenDNS service. Going to the OpenDNS website and logging in allows you to set up your routers public IP address with their service, so that anything coming from that IP address can have specified filters applied to it. You can then modify a list of categories which are to be filtered (blocked).

The way this works is, any time one of your computers accesses something on the internet, it'll usually begin accessing it using a host name, eg: "google.com". A host name isn't enough though, to actually connect to a server, that host name needs to be resolved (converted) to a valid IP address. Your ISP's DNS servers would usually do this. However, if you set your DNS settings to point to OpenDNS, when accessing certain "filtered" sites that you've chosen, OpenDNS will not resolve the host name to the correct IP, instead it will redirect the user to a "blocked" page.

In this way, certain content is blocked.

Some things to note:
  • The system isn't fool proof. If a website is initially accessed using it's IP address, this will bypass the OpenDNS filtering. For example, you could access Google using this address instead of the regular host name: http://74.125.43.99
  • In an ideal world, you would use this in conjunction with router settings. Some routers (such as Billion) have options for preventing browsing via IP (so DNS must be used) and native blocking for common file sharing protocols.
  • To obtain an IP address for any given domain is quite easy. There are many websites that provide such services, such as Kloth.net
  • This is most effectively set up by changing the DNS settings on the router, but it can also be done by changing these settings on the computer. If your daughter has admin access to her computer however, she could easily change the settings there again.
  • Depending on your internet connection, you may have a dynamic IP, not the ideal static IP. If this is the case, your modem may have an OpenDNS updater function built-in, otherwise, 3rd party software may be needed to update your OpenDNS settings automatically when your IP address changes.
  • Even if you don't activate filtering on the OpenDNS service, it's a very reliable and fast service, which provides basic security against phishing (malicious websites pretending to be legitimate websites).
 

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