Home Network--File Access vs Drive Only?

DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#1
Finally getting around to networking some home computers. There are several, all connected to the internet via a wired router and a switch. The guides I read all mention file permissions, but some of my storage is set up on drive partitions with the main body of contents not in a file. In order to manage the permissions, do I need to create a master file in these partitions and then grant permissions?

Second question, does encrypting the drive or the file interfere with this? Haven't done any encrypting yet, but if I start networking it would seem prudent.
 
Steve R Jones

Steve R Jones

Administrator
#2
Usually you only have to "share" a folder and the other computers can access that folder and everything underneath it.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#3
My bad. I used the word "file" when I should have used the word "folder".
 
Bink

Bink

Will moderate for food
#4
There are about three ways you can manage shares and permissions on a Windows based home network, often depending on which version of Windows you're running.

I tend to prefer User Level Security for my shares, so I can allow/deny share permissions based on particular users. It also means I can refine read and/or write permissions on a per-user basis too.

Whether or not you apply the share to the whole drive, or one or many particular folders is up to you. From a security point of view, one should be specific about what they share over a network, but this is a home network and perhaps you don't mind chancing a general drive share.

Don't encrypt the data, especially not using the Windows native encryption. You run the risk of losing all your data permanently in the event of a system failure.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#5
Thanks, Bink. Since this is a single person home, a general drive share should not be an issue. I'm more concerned about security to the outside world.
 
Steve R Jones

Steve R Jones

Administrator
#6
If one pc does get hacked - they then have access to the whole drive on the other pc;)
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#7
If one pc does get hacked - they then have access to the whole drive on the other pc;)
That's why I wondered about encryption. Using a firewall and Anti-Vir and I run FF with NoScript, but I'm well aware that anyone who thinks they're immune is deluding himself. The recent SSL exploit is a great example.

It's like riding a motorcycle. It's not if you ever go down, it's when.
 

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