Extreme overclocking benefits...

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biglilsteve

New Member
#1
I have a pretty nice overclock on my e8400 (stock @ 3.0GHz)...currently running at 4.05GHz stable idling @ 34C with Prime95 load @ 50C. I'm beginning to question the benefits of overclocking this much, though.

My first overclock was from 3.0 to 3.6 and that produced a large performance gain. 3DMark06 score soared from ~13,500 to ~15,500. Vista performance rating went from 5.6 to 5.8 (who cares, but still).

I then took it to 4.05GHz and I saw little to no overall performance increase. 3DMark06 increased around 300 points to ~15,800 and Vista performance rating did not change.

I'm definitely not a pro when it comes to benchmarking, but is there really any point in overclocking this high? Are there some areas that can actually benefit from a an overclock like this that I am unaware of?
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#2
More importantly, what voltage did it use at 3.6G and what is it at now at 4.05G?
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#3
More importantly, what voltage did it use at 3.6G and what is it at now at 4.05G?
Ummm...at 3.6 it was using 1.2ish vcore, and right now CPU-Z is reporting 1.320. That's with the BIOS set to auto for vcore.
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#4
That's exactly why you benchmark in increments. Once you OC your cpu and hit a plateau, that means something else is the bottleneck. I'd suspect the video cards.
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#5
That's exactly why you benchmark in increments. Once you OC your cpu and hit a plateau, that means something else is the bottleneck. I'd suspect the video cards.
That's exactly what I suspect as well.
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#6
The bottleneck was the two 8800GTS's. Once I swapped them out for a GTX 280 and overclocked it a bit, my 3DMark06 jumped to ~17,500. Second 280 is arriving tomorrow; can't wait to see how that turns out!
 
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ELF2000

New Member
#9
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