extend internet via DSL line?

N

networkme

New Member
#1
Hello,

I have looked, and looked, and no luck…

I need to get my internet to reach to a new home office that is too far for wireless, and which cannot be hard-wired with ethernet, coaxial, etc. I foolishly assumed that since there’s a phone jack in there, it’d be a piece of cake. Not cake. [I cannot get a second DSL line, as there are none available.]

Is there any way at all to use existing DSL phone line from jack to add a second modem or modem as repeater to DSL network? I have two modems and a router i’m willing to sacrifice to the cause.

**Surely, there must be a way to use the cables on which the internet signal comes into the house to set up a second wifi spot?? ** Some hack, some device, something?

If not can anyone at explain why? This seems like such an obvious boon to humankind.

thanks
 
N

networkme

New Member
#3
Hi Doc, I think i didn't make it clear that i already have one modem hooked up to the dsl line. I would like to somehow hook up another in the new room.

I need to get my internet to reach to a new home office that is too far for wireless, and which cannot be hard-wired with ethernet, coaxial, etc. I foolishly assumed that since there’s a phone jack in there, it’d be a piece of cake. Not cake. [I cannot get a second DSL line, as there are none available.]

thanks
 
SpywareDr

SpywareDr

Member
#4
You might check with your DSL service provider to see if they have some sort of a "two DSL modem on one line" solution available.
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#5
I'll reply on this thread, since the other one is 8 years old.

Is there any way at all to use existing DSL phone line from jack to add a second modem or modem as repeater to DSL network?
NO. Even if the ISP was ok with it, you can only have one DSL data stream per line.

What do you mean it is "too far for wireless"? If the room is out of your wifi router's range, can't you add a repeater halfway between the new office and the router?

You need to explain the layout in more detail.
 
SpywareDr

SpywareDr

Member
#6
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi#Range
A typical wireless access point using 802.11b or 802.11g with a stock antenna might have a range of 35 m (115 ft) indoors and 100 m (330 ft) outdoors. IEEE 802.11n, however, can more than double the range.[43] Range also varies with frequency band. Wi-Fi in the 2.4 GHz frequency block has slightly better range than Wi-Fi in the 5 GHz frequency block used by 802.11a (and optionally by 802.11n). On wireless routers with detachable antennas, it is possible to improve range by fitting upgraded antennas which have higher gain in particular directions. Outdoor ranges can be improved to many kilometers through the use of high gain directional antennas at the router and remote device(s).
...
Distance records (using non-standard devices) include 382 km (237 mi) in June 2007, held by Ermanno Pietrosemoli and EsLaRed of Venezuela, transferring about 3 MB of data between the mountain-tops of El Águila and Platillon.[50][51] The Swedish Space Agency transferred data 420 km (260 mi), using 6 watt amplifiers to reach an overhead stratospheric balloon.[52]
 
SpywareDr

SpywareDr

Member
#8
I've been using them for quite a while with no complaints. Plug 'em in and forget 'em. <shrug> :)

Unfortunately, the OP stated in the other thread "or power line are not options".
 
N

networkme

New Member
#9
Hi Doc, Thanks for the replies. No two modem service here.

Will these upgraded antennas go through multiple brick walls? I think that's our main problem. Signal gets really weak, then disappears. The new room is only about 15 meters from the router. New room is wired separately, so powerline extenders won't work. Had i known, they'd be wired together...

Would you happen to know if any modem will work with a certain ISP, or does it have to be a special one? Am in Mexico and bought a 3d party modem known to work with Telmex. I would upgrade to a better one with better antennae, if it would help.

Thanks.
 
SpywareDr

SpywareDr

Member
#10
If they're that close together, can't you bury an underground Ethernet cable down about a half a meter or so between the two buildings? Here in the U.S. you can rent a little trencher to open up a slot to drop the cable into.
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#11
Will these upgraded antennas go through multiple brick walls?
No guarantees. Solid walls will block the signal, even if you get stronger antennas.

Would you happen to know if any modem will work with a certain ISP, or does it have to be a special one? Am in Mexico and bought a 3d party modem known to work with Telmex. I would upgrade to a better one with better antennae, if it would help.
You would need to check with your ISP (Telmex).

So you're using Wifi off of the modem? Make/model of your hardware would help. Most combo modem/router/WAP have pretty weak signals.
I would turn off the Wifi in the modem and use a dedicated Wifi router instead.
 
N

networkme

New Member
#12
No guarantees. Solid walls will block the signal, even if you get stronger antennas.

You would need to check with your ISP (Telmex).

So you're using Wifi off of the modem? Make/model of your hardware would help. Most combo modem/router/WAP have pretty weak signals.
I would turn off the Wifi in the modem and use a dedicated Wifi router instead.
Thanks Midknyte,

Problem is that Telmex is the opposite of helpful. If they hear you're using a 3d party modem, they refuse to give any support whatsoever. Much less will they suggest modems other than the junky ones they sell at extortionate prices. The joys of a monopoly.

The modem is a Technicolor TG582n. (Which i'm sure is bottom of the line.) On forums, i found a couple that work with Telmex. A Tenda W3000D, which i have set up as a repeater., which reaches a bit to office, but have ethernet cable taped to living room floor. Also have a llittle linksis/cysco router not in use at the moment.

I don't know what you mean by "turn off the Wifi in the modem and use a dedicated Wifi router instead." That would increase signal?

I can run ethernet, but the problem is getting it out of the house...the way things are set up, I can't without having it taped to the living room floor. Am trying to look for a wireless alternative. But i guess there is no way to use the phone wiring/jack, which seems absurd. But there it is.

Thanks for your time, everyone!
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#13
I've never heard of a Technicolor TG582n.

I don't know what you mean by "turn off the Wifi in the modem and use a dedicated Wifi router instead." That would increase signal?
It's exactly as I said. Go into the modem's configuration page and then disable the Wifi feature. Then connect a Wifi router (like your linksys) and use that instead. A dedicated Wifi should have better performance than one of those combo modem/routers. You didn't give the router model number, so I can't say if it's that much better.

What is the closest you can run an ethernet cable to the office? You could run an ethernet cable and set up your Wifi router as a second WAP.
http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wire...onvert-a-wireless-router-into-an-access-point
 
N

networkme

New Member
#14
I've never heard of a Technicolor TG582n.


It's exactly as I said. Go into the modem's configuration page and then disable the Wifi feature. Then connect a Wifi router (like your linksys) and use that instead. A dedicated Wifi should have better performance than one of those combo modem/routers. You didn't give the router model number, so I can't say if it's that much better.

What is the closest you can run an ethernet cable to the office? You could run an ethernet cable and set up your Wifi router as a second WAP.
http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wire...onvert-a-wireless-router-into-an-access-point
Hi, thanks. using the dedicated router improved things a bit. The Lynksis/Cisco router is a WRT120N.

It looks like the Netgear N600 WIFI Access Point works with my ISP, so I may look into that. Supposed to be better quality.

Question: would i plug the ethernet cable going to the WAP into the original router or the dedicated Lynksis router?

Thanks for your help!
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#15
Ah, the WRT120N is still on the lower end. The fact that the WRT120N helped shows how weak the router's Wifi is.

Netgear N600 WIFI Access Point
What is the exact model number?

Question: would i plug the ethernet cable going to the WAP into the original router or the dedicated Lynksis router?
How do you want your network to be set up?
If you are still going to use the Linksys and are going to ADD the Netgear, you would plug the Netgear into the Linksys and set it up as a second WAP (see the links I posted earlier about adding a second WAP).
If you aren't going to use the Linksys anymore, then connect the Netgear to the modem/router.
 
SexyMF

SexyMF

Multiphasic
#16
I am unclear on the physical setup here. You have a phone line which is an extension circuit of the main house? but the electrical is a different connection (i.e. not a sub-board)

It would seem to me that you must bite the bullet and invest in sorting out Ethernet wiring/outlets in your house and office.

You will waste money mucking around with wireless and at the end of the day wireless is orders of magnitude slower than hardwired solutions. It may connect higher bandwidths than your ISP but do anything else like transfer files from a PC in you house and it is slow.

But I suspect there is something else in this situation as to why you have not simple run a cable.
 
iwajabitw

iwajabitw

Member
#17
I use powerline adapters to get to those rooms I did not hardwire CAT to and its at the edge of the wifi, Netgear Gigabit Powerline adapters. Should not be a problem to do for your office, IF, the power to your office is pulled/tapped from your home. If its a separate metered structure, that you receive a seperate utility bill for, it wont work. And you can always tap your wired Ethernet, dig a trench to the office and pull the wire through conduit over to the office. Home Depot or Lowes both sell a garden hose adapter that will trench under sidewalks or driveways. I don't really understand the layout of your property and its utilities to suggest more.
 
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J

Johnywalter

New Member
#19
Hello all,

I just moved in with some friends that have DSL Internet. Over ethernet I can get 1.5 to 2 MB/s downloads, but over Wifi, I only yet like 300 KB/s. I am wondering if it would be worth it to add a better router so I can access the Internet from my room as there isn't a way to route ethernet back there. Could I get anywhere near 1.5 MB/s by adding a good router? Also, what steps would I have to take to run a router off of a DSL router/modem combo?

Any help is much appreciated.

Thanks!
 
SpywareDr

SpywareDr

Member
#20
Wikipedia: WiFi > Interference
Interference

Wi-Fi connections can be disrupted or the internet speed lowered by having other devices in the same area. Many 2.4 GHz 802.11b and 802.11g access-points default to the same channel on initial startup, contributing to congestion on certain channels. Wi-Fi pollution, or an excessive number of access points in the area, especially on the neighboring channel, can prevent access and interfere with other devices' use of other access points, caused by overlapping channels in the 802.11g/b spectrum, as well as with decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between access points. This can become a problem in high-density areas, such as large apartment complexes or office buildings with many Wi-Fi access points.

Additionally, other devices use the 2.4 GHz band: microwave ovens, ISM band devices, security cameras, ZigBee devices, Bluetooth devices, video senders, cordless phones, baby monitors, and (in some countries) Amateur radio all of which can cause significant additional interference. It is also an issue when municipalities or other large entities (such as universities) seek to provide large area coverage.

For more details on this topic, see Electromagnetic interference at 2.4 GHz.
Even bad electrical connections can cause broad RF spectrum emissions.
 

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