Desk Placement for Optimum Bass

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biglilsteve

New Member
#1
Does my desk really need to be setting in the corner of the room to be able to get the most bass effect from the sub? I have an extremely tight bedroom that does not allow the desk to be placed in the corner.
 
krupted

krupted

New Member
#2
it depends on factors of about everything. without special equipment and appropriate knowledge, the best way is trial and error.
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#3
Oh, I thought that it may be common knowledge or something. People say that it is usually optimal to put the subwoofer in a corner when possible, and i was just wondering if the same might apply to your actual sitting position.
 
Burnt Powder

Burnt Powder

New Member
#4
Just put it under your desk........where ever it is you decide to move the desk.
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#5
ehh...the sub's kinda huge...i just ordered the logitech z-5500 and the sub is something like 15x15x17...
 
krupted

krupted

New Member
#6
yeah i would just try different setups. you will notice how the bass always seems to get excluded right where you sit, no matter how you position the sub (murphy's law). and you will also always have that one spot in the room that just BOOMS with bass. hopefully you can come up with a good compromise
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#7
If you have a large sub a corner may not be best. It will give you the most bass reinforcement, but the response may be more ragged, with more peaks and dips. Moving it away from the corner should smooth it out.
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#8
Ah, very interesting. Yeah, krupted, that's a shame it always seems to work like that heh. And thanks, DanceMan, I will most definitely keep that in mind if I have trouble once I set the system up.
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#9
biglilsteve said:
And thanks, DanceMan, I will most definitely keep that in mind if I have trouble once I set the system up.
There have been articles in the audio mags showing what happens to the response curve at different placements. It's all about the reflections and math. Calculate the resonant frequency of the room, which is the bass frequencies matching the room length, width and height, and look at the positioning that will add to these resonances or minimise them.

In simpler terms, start with the sub where it's convenient, and move it away or toward the corner, and away from or closer to the wall, or elevate it off the floor until you eliminate the boominess from the room resonances.

The math part is simple. Working from the resonant frequencies, the positioning from reflective surfaces will likely create or increase peaks when you have exact fractions of those frequencies. Ironically, a computer program would probably be the best way of doing the calculations.
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#10
DanceMan said:
In simpler terms, start with the sub where it's convenient, and move it away or toward the corner, and away from or closer to the wall, or elevate it off the floor until you eliminate the boominess from the room resonances.
Yeah I could only understand the n00b paragraph, so that's the one I'm going to quote :D . I had never considered that elevating the sub might change the way it sounds. So what do you mean by "eliminating the boominess from the room resonances"?
 
DanceMan

DanceMan

Procrastinating Member
#11
The length of a bass note matches the size of an average room. Or in reverse, the average room dimensions match certain bass frequencies. You can calculate them but I don't have the formula at hand. The bass will be reinforced at those frequencies. A resonance means the note hangs on after the source has stopped producing it. To your ear, the bass will sound boomy at those frequencies. The worst case example would be a room 8' high X 8' long and wide because all three dimensions will resonate the same frequency. A room 8' x12' x 12' would have two resonant frequencies, primary on the 12' note, but since 12' is exactly 50% larger than 8', the 8' dimension would still get a boost.

A theoretically perfect speaker radiating in an anechoic chamber (no reflections, 100% absorption) could have a flat frequency response. As soon as you put it in a real room, the frequency response will have peaks and dips from reflected waves adding together and cancelling. When the room dimensions match certain frequencies, those will be enhanced. When the distance from the source to a reflecting surface is an exact fraction of a given frequency, the adding and cancelling gets worse. Think of the wave tanks in elementary physics to get a visual idea of it.
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#12
Alright all that makes perfect sense! So could adjustments in the position of the subwoofer of only inches in any direction or height make a audible difference in the responsiveness of the bass?...or would the adjustments have to be substantial (feet or more) in order to make a significant enough difference?
 
krupted

krupted

New Member
#13
i think you will have to try it and see man, i have setup and played with hundreds of cars, rooms, etc with subs and it really comes down to so many factors that you cant really calculate anything precisely without the specialized equipment and techniques. i have found over the years a superior-tuned sub can have huge results from a little package, but that almost always requires major overhaul and change to the room or car (ie, take out the back car seats and put the transom for the subs there). its always easiest to just get the biggest, strongest subs and amps you can. once you get to a certain point it really doesnt matter how theyre positioned, because the screws are popping out of your drywall anyway :D
 
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biglilsteve

New Member
#14
Haha yeah that's why I went with the Z-5500. 505w rms should do the trick for my small (~10x14) room. thanks a lot for your input people!
 

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