Converting AT case to ATX with minimal tools.

O

ol' man

workin fingas to the bone
#1
Today i converted a old oversize AT aopen case to a ATX case. Well at least it holds my micro ATX:D

What I did was take out the brass nipples off the bottom of the case that are arranged in the at screw layout.

What I did was screw a 1/2 inch piece of wood the size of the mobo into the case bottom. Ironically the mATX mobo fit into the AT case with PSU. Only thing I had to do was remove some of the back plate with tin snips for the ps2 and usb ports to be open as also the printer port. All of the PCI slots lined up after I moved the slots after moving it and then I rescrewed the PCI slots down onto the case. I moved the mobo to match the PCI slots and screwed them down randomly into the 1/2" piece of wood. It is running the cel 500MHz below. Trying to get my old POS nvidia riva to run on my TV to make this a livingroom computer so when I want to check HWC I don't have to run to the backroom:D
 
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deltree_windows

deltree_windows

Computer Newbie
#2
you can also just tap new screw holes in the right positions. i think the threads are either #6-32 or M3
 
J

JollyRoger

New Member
#3
Originally posted by deltree_windows
you can also just tap new screw holes in the right positions. i think the threads are either #6-32 or M3
indeed you can, in fact I myself have adopted the tactic of drilling slightly undersized holes in the baseplate and screwing standard comp screws into them (they do self tap, even if they're not supposed to ;))

Ol'mans method is equally valid and it probably deppends what tools you have laying around as to which is easier.

anyway nice mod Ol'man, congrats on saving yourself £20 or so. :)
 
Todd a

Todd a

New Member
#4
The few times I did it a few of the screw holes actually lined up so I just used them. Then I slid a few sheets of anti-static foam behind the board ( the stuff that ships with most motherboards) and zip-tied a few other holes down around the edge. Worked fine. I used a jig-saw to cut out for an i/o sheild I had laying around. I also was using a micro ATX board. I've got a nice full tower AT case I got from my dad's old 486 he had. Been thinking of mod'n it a bit. The 80mm hole on top will need to be cut for a 120mm fan for my water cooling. :p
 
flat-v8

flat-v8

New Member
#5
I need to do that. I was givin a nice tall full AT tower, built like a tank! I mean super heavy duty and thick metal, but a pain to convert to ATX. All the com ports and such were spread out in the rear and connect with cables. I'm gonna try to salvage this case, If I can figure out how to install the ATX rear plate. It would make a killer server.
 
J

JollyRoger

New Member
#6
Originally posted by Todd a
The few times I did it a few of the screw holes actually lined up so I just used them. Then I slid a few sheets of anti-static foam behind the board ( the stuff that ships with most motherboards) and zip-tied a few other holes down around the edge. Worked fine. I used a jig-saw to cut out for an i/o sheild I had laying around. I also was using a micro ATX board. I've got a nice full tower AT case I got from my dad's old 486 he had. Been thinking of mod'n it a bit. The 80mm hole on top will need to be cut for a 120mm fan for my water cooling. :p
some cases even have both sets of holes pre-drilled. The machine I did was different though, cause I was trying to fit a Compaq mobo to a standard ATX case. Now THAT was fun.
 
agw_01

agw_01

Modified Member
#7
When I have enough spare parts left over and I can't be bothered buying or modding a case, I just get a normal ATX motherboard box and build the system in there.

On-board stuff works best, and then you dont have any cards taking up the expansion slots, which can be left to sit the hard disk on :D

Stick a 60mm fan through the side of the box, and have the psu taped to the side of the box :D and there ya go. lol
 

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