Asus v8200 GF3 Ram w/b build, ( just call me Rotor ;-)

BladeRunner

BladeRunner

Silent & Cool.....
#1
Originally posted by #Rotor some time ago:
those blocks are nice......... or you might want to go for it and make your own, believe me the satisfaction derived from that is unsurpassed.
Yep, I know exactly what he means now

Asus v8200 water-cooling project, (Ram), build so far:-








[This message has been edited by BladeRunner (edited 07-01-2001).]
 
D

D|sElMiNk

New Member
#3


I'm speechless!!!

That is the most amazingly beautiful piece of machined metal I've ever seen


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CenturionStrategy

CenturionStrategy

Super Moderator
#4
my
god


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K62

K62

Sailor
#5
Thats hotter then my girlfirend =D

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Neil01952

Hardcore Biker
#6
Impressive. How long did it take?

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snakej_777

New Member
#7
very impressive...i wish i had your tools at my disposal...that's a great design and even better is the quality of it's construction.
 
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Mbeach

New Member
#8
Dear GOD... that's impressive!!!!!


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Honey, i'm so SORRY for spending that cash on a watercooling rig... so sorry... Ouch!!
 
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Gasman

Can you smell burning?
#9
Looks a bit shoddy to me


Look at the way all the edges are nice and smooth, not rough at all. How are you supposed to cut your finger on that?

And the way the surfaces are all nice and flat. Your just asking for good contact with that!! Tut!

And I dont have to mention the way all those little screws have been lovingly countersunk. Did you have to use so many? I mean how are you gonna get leaks with that sort of craftsmanship?


I'm gonna cry off now with my little orange sinks


I seem to be turning a shade of green! Damn!

Its a shame to hide it in your case.

BTW: What did you use to cut the metal so acurately? Esp the rounded bits.



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M

Mbeach

New Member
#10
Originally posted by Gasman:

BTW: What did you use to cut the metal so acurately? Esp the rounded bits.
A dremel perhaps???


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Honey, i'm so SORRY for spending that cash on a watercooling rig... so sorry... Ouch!!
 
BladeRunner

BladeRunner

Silent & Cool.....
#11
Thanks for the praise folks
and I hope this topic doesn't come off as chest beating on my part, as that's not my intention. I just thought you'd like to see what can be made with some fairly basic materials and tools, (I love seeing things like this myself). I'd like to say I had used some very expensive equipment, but only a 40 year old broken lathe, (as a milling bed that has no motor), and a cheap and nasty Wickes pillar drill with the worst chuck I've ever come across!!. I also required some Drills, Taps, Dies, Digital Calipers, (helpful but not essential), and the materials/screws etc.

To say how long it took is hard because it takes a while to work out a design then take measurements, make a detailed working drawing and the decided what I needed and start making it. It's taken about a week of evenings from start to finish the machining.

Here's my working drawing (done in MS paint).



The rest of it is time & patience for the most part. I did try to mill the slot at first but the pillar drill & lathe bed was not up to it and in danger of breaking. The slot was also going askew. I decided just drilling down with the slot cutter would do as flow rate is not a major issue.



You can see here the "basic" milling equipment and how I "Rounded the edges" drilling holes all the way through then cutting it out with a junior hacksaw. The rest is done with a selection of metal files and elbow grease, I have the sore fingers to prove it


For clearer images the pictures are links to full page detailed ones, to keep the page load time down.

I now need to seal the inlet, outlet and base plate. Then I'll pressure test it with 2 Bar, (28PSI), air pressure with the block immersed in water for a few days to ensure no leaks before using nylon screws in the four remaining holes to mount it on the card. All the screws that hold the copper baseplate on are set, (where possible), so as to be in between the ram chips when it's on the card.

Talking of Rotor, does anyone know where he went?



[This message has been edited by BladeRunner (edited 07-01-2001).]
 
AUDSCOTT

AUDSCOTT

New Member
#12
Originally posted by BladeRunner
Thanks for the praise folks and I hope this topic doesn't come off as chest beating on my part, as that's not my intention.
There's absolutely no one who posts more imformative material than BR with less ego attached....always a good read.

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Scott
 
M

Mbeach

New Member
#13
Originally posted by BladeRunner:

Talking of Rotor, does anyone know where he went?
Last thing i heard was that he moved and had problems getting on the net. His superior cooling site (http://3rotor.safeshopper.com) seems to be down as well... He probably hangs out here



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Honey, i'm so SORRY for spending that cash on a watercooling rig... so sorry... Ouch!!
 
wrathchild_67

wrathchild_67

Hidden Member
#14
Yes, but how well does it work??? Were you able to approach 575Mhz with the memory?

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BladeRunner

BladeRunner

Silent & Cool.....
#15
Don't know about the O/C yet, (not putting it on a £400 graphics card until I'm happy it wont leak
). O/c however was not the main reason for water-cooling the ram. I'm attempting to build a Zero fan PC so every heat producing item requires a block, HDD's, PSU, and maybe System Ram too. Even things that don't seem all that hot could be if you remove the forced airflow. If it's good ram on the card it should o/c well, considering the water temp is around 13°C presently, and hopefully around 8°C when the geo-thermal cooling tank is installed
 
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cyril1

New Member
#16
Amazing work. Glad I could help just a little in the project. I think I'm in love with your camera.

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NewBlackDak

NewBlackDak

rm -rf /
#17
I've never seen one in person, so don't ream me too bad. Aren't the core and memory modules the same height? If they are, wouldn't it have been easier to have a single block cooling the core and RAM? Since you're obviously going to have a block on the core of your fan-less system, it seems more logical to have as few connections as possible. A single block on the video card would cut out two connectors, but I could be wrong.

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BladeRunner

BladeRunner

Silent & Cool.....
#18
When I first saw Rotor's cooling I was
but it looks like I've caught the bug too.
Thanks also goes to those that have helped me with the pulse gen part of this project cyril1, CALV & others, because electronics is definitely not my field.


I just wanted people here to see there really are no expensive special tools required to make stuff like this, just a plan, design, some tools & effort.

NewBlackDak

I had looked into a one piece heatsink but the ram and GPU are unfortunately at different levels. It could still be done but I decided against it due to possible poor GPU to heatsink contact. The extra connections are not a problem as I'll have a manifold due to all the other water-cooled items.
 
Oliy

Oliy

New Member
#19
i was going to say HA! you should have milled the channel inside, but then i realised that it was actually a damn good idea to have it like it is, get much better surface area contact = better cooling! so then i would obviously just look silly if i said that :p
I've always wondered if you had to use water, coz it ionizes and makes ions which is what make it conduct water, therefore making it dangerous to have in a PC (duh!) so is there some type of un-ionised water or some other liquid with the same sort of specific heat capacity and fluidity that doesnt condut elctricity? it would make things so much safer, unless you overheated due to coolant loss rather than merely shorting everything and electrocuting yourself!
What do you plan to do about cooling the power supply? I think those indicator LEDs require a bit of cooling too
CD-Rom? floppy? clock gen?
put a window in your case - it would be a shame for all that fantastic work to go unrecognized by the casual observer.
keep up the great work!
someone tell #rotor that bladerunner is stealing his spot


O

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BladeRunner

BladeRunner

Silent & Cool.....
#20
I would have milled it if I could, (I like it neat even if I can't see it). As my water temp will be around 10°C give or take it wont require extra surface area or slower flow for heat transfer. The whole block will become water temp quickly so absorbing any small amount of heat the ram creates, The water, (or coolant to be correct), flows directly on the copper baseplate which is 2mm thick the other side will be in contact with the ram. I don't think it will matter, anyhow I've sealed it now and ran tap water through it, gets to water temp pretty quick ), especially the copper baseplate.

The best way to ensure no water/electronics mix in side the PC is to make damn sure it can't leak to the best of your ability. I'm looking into using some pneumatic pipe fittings in the future, (rated at 10 bar air pressure), as I'm not 100% happy about the push on type unions with plastic pipe myself. A pure alcohol coolant based system could work but it would be expensive and I'd only drink it.

The PSU is a bit more tricky as I'm not sure about all the components that will require cooling, output transistors on the heatsinks and the transformer I know but there could be other things getting hot when you remove the airflow. I did have a talk with Rotor about this in the past. Good point about the clock gen. forgotten about that, a passive sink glued on with artic silver epoxy should suffice.

couple more pics for all you image junkies like me


 

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