2.5" Hard Disk Enclosure - Driver Problem

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goodtyneguy

New Member
#1
I purchased the above from Amazon UK see link below:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/MY-Link-EXT...1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1239814313&sr=8-1

The driver CD did not auto run after I inserted it in my CD drive. The CD contains a number of folders which I can not identify with the enclosure. In fact the enclosure does not have a manufacturers name on it or the box it came in. I have however been able to establish it is made by Initio but their site does not help at all.

The folders are:

9in_card reader
1511
1610
68300_AT2
ALI
AU6390
CS8818 Windows 98 Driver
GL811
JM20336-9
Nec720130
PL2506
PL3507vt6204

Files:
_desktop.ini
Thumbs.db

Can anyone help please? I presume once I find the right folder it's just case of running the exe file?
 
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Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#2
You normally don't need drivers unless you are using Win98SE. If you are running XP SP3 like your sig says, then check device manager and disk management.
 
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goodtyneguy

New Member
#3
ah haaa, found where I need to be - control panel\administrative tools\computer management\disk management

Thanks Midknyte, I've initialised it (there's a new hard drive in there)but it does n't appear in the directory tree in explorer?

I guess I need to use the help files as this is new to me.
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#6
If the old drive is going bad, I wouldn't waste time trying to image it. I'd do a clean install of Windows and just transfer data. GIGO = garbage in, garbage out. If there is corrupted data on the old drive, you'll just be transferring problems to the new drive.
 
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goodtyneguy

New Member
#7
When doing checkdisk it rarely shows any corrections and my laptop is working OK except it's slow. A know the drive is only working at about one third of the speed it should be doing. What you're saying makes good sense though.

I did n't get the XP cd when I bought the laptop only the recovery disks and that was about 5 years ago so will have to start with XP and build through the service packs. Then re-install all my favourite proggies, nightmare!
 
Shinma

Shinma

____________
#8
... so will have to start with XP and build through the service packs. Then re-install all my favourite proggies, nightmare!
?
Use recovery disc set, remove bloatware (junk/trial/unnecessary software preinstalled with recovery disc set), install service pack 3, install hotfixes, install your programs, test for a few days, then create a image.
 
G

goodtyneguy

New Member
#9
?
Use recovery disc set, remove bloatware (junk/trial/unnecessary software preinstalled with recovery disc set), install service pack 3, install hotfixes, install your programs, test for a few days, then create a image.
As you may have gathered I'm not very tech savvy. I do find this stuff interesting and want to learn as much as possible to take care of my computer myself rather than have to pay a third party.

To assist me in carrying out your recomendation could you kindly answer my questions below:

Firstly I need to format and partition my new hard drive in the enclosure:

1) Would it be best to assign this drive as "C" in the process and

2) I was thinking of creating two partitions, a large one for the software/applications and operating system and a smaller one for data storage, is this a good idea? Any other tips welcomed.

3) I take it that before I remove the old HD I need to ensure that the bios is set to boot from my CD drive first. Then it's just a case of physically installing the formatted and partitioned new HD and inserting the CD recovery disk in the CD drive and following the instructions?

4) I'm wondering how I get it to write to the right partition?

Thanks for the help.
 
Midknyte

Midknyte

Caffeine Fiend
#10
1) No. Your system drive should be C:, not the external. In fact, you shouldn't be using the external enclosure at all. Put the new unformatted drive into the system first, then do the windows install. Don't try to install windows on an external drive. You will create the system partition and format it during the setup. You create the data partition after you boot into Windows.

2) Yes. 2 partitions would be a good idea.

3) Install the new drive "blank". You don't need to pre-partition or format.

4) If you have a recovery disc, it will automatically set everything up. Only have the new drive connected; disconnect the old bad drive while you are installing Windows.
 
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goodtyneguy

New Member
#11
1) No. Your system drive should be C:, not the external. In fact, you shouldn't be using the external enclosure at all. Put the new unformatted drive into the system first, then do the windows install. Don't try to install windows on an external drive. You will create the system partition and format it during the setup. You create the data partition after you boot into Windows.

2) Yes. 2 partitions would be a good idea.

3) Install the new drive "blank". You don't need to pre-partition or format.

4) If you have a recovery disc, it will automatically set everything up. Only have the new drive connected; disconnect the old bad drive while you are installing Windows.
Great help.

I'll remove the old bad HD and replace it with the new one and carry out the proceedure as you describe.

Thanks again :)
 
jimbo1763

jimbo1763

Moderator
#12
I may have missed it, but I do not see that you ever say whether you are working on a laptop or not. I have assumed that you are, because you are talking about a 2.5" drive. However, a 2.5" drive in an enclosure does not necessarily equate to your working on a laptop.

However, assuming that you are, when you take out the old hard drive, be on the lookout for a possible adapter that connects to the pins at the business end of the one that you take out. You will need to remove the adapter from the old drive and put it on the new one in order for the new one to go back in correctly. Just a heads up on that.
 
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goodtyneguy

New Member
#13
I may have missed it, but I do not see that you ever say whether you are working on a laptop or not. I have assumed that you are, because you are talking about a 2.5" drive. However, a 2.5" drive in an enclosure does not necessarily equate to your working on a laptop.

However, assuming that you are, when you take out the old hard drive, be on the lookout for a possible adapter that connects to the pins at the business end of the one that you take out. You will need to remove the adapter from the old drive and put it on the new one in order for the new one to go back in correctly. Just a heads up on that.
Thanks jimbo1763, you are correct sir, it is a laptop and I will be mindful of your comment (Hat tip to you):)
 
A

alexBB

New Member
#14
In principle it is feasible to install an operating sysem on an external hard drive but not the one your purchased because it is USB connected. If it were an enclosure that plugs into a PCIe card that you have to install on your machine (provided it is PCIe enabled) then you could do it. Those connectors are very fast and potentially can handle multiboot meaning that a second or third OS could be installed in enclosures.
 
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goodtyneguy

New Member
#15
Thank you AlexBB that an interesting comment. I had intended to install the new HDD in my laptop but after having done numerous tests using the various freeware apps that are available there is no indication that my drive is faulty. A little slow yes.

Recent problems I've had is for example when I go to close down the USB memory stick I get a message telling me I need to close the applications that are on that stick before I can do so. There is no open applications on the task bar and task manager has nothing listed. I get the same message when I open firefox and it tells me firefox is aleady running but nothing on the task bar or in task manager.

Another thing is when I close the only window that is open it curtains down slowly like water draining out of a bath to reveal the desktop behind. Tests on the memory and the Graphics card say it's OK, very puzzeling?
 
jimbo1763

jimbo1763

Moderator
#16
Just as a test, you might try temporarily disabling your anti-virus software and see if that speeds things up. Some can be an incredible hog on resources.

You also might want to look at task manager to see what is actually running in the background (even though nothing shows on the task bar). You may have something going there that you don't need or want. If that turns out to be the case, use msconfig to access the startup menu so you can take care of it.
 
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alexBB

New Member
#17
Well, there are two issues here. The memory stick is most likely the manufacturer's fault. What they do, sons of *****es, they install some icons on your machine or some other software for the sake of promoting their image and also they think that it will facilitate your work somehow as if you don't know that you stuck their stick in the back of your laptop. They also put their registry keys in as well. That software link holds the stick open and you cannot close it no matter what. I don't know if this is the case with XP but in Vista there are two options: Safely Remove and Reject. If you try Safely Remove you will never succeed but you can use Reject and that will work, however Reject is indifferent to the state of the stick. If your filestream is still in progress it will be closed and if you were trying to read/write the stick the files will be corrupted. The only way to handle it is to wait a few extra minutes and then Reject.

There are some brands that do not have it for instance Kingston. I like them because they do not install any garbage in the registry.

This is not the only reason this might happen. Some drivers for the sticks, especially on x64 systems, cannot handle proper disconnect. I faced this when I purchased Iomega portable 360 Gb external HDD (eGO), very cute and small, plus it is encypted. I run x64 Vista Ult and I cannot disconnect the SOB for the life of me. I've had instances of files currupted when I disconnected hastily although this is a very fast write and read hardware. I contacted Iomega and they said that teh bug has been recognized and it is on their website but ho new firmware is contemplated.

With the windows slow cascading off I suggest installing the latest version IE v8, perhaps this will help but my hunch is that the graphics card is the culprit Probably the buffer is too small. Modern graphics require a lot of RAM to operate.

I also have a similar issue even on my ultra fast systems. I used to do a lot of Visual Fox Pro applications and the package comes with a Management Studio. It worked just fine in XP but with the advent of Vista MS decided to jettison VFP completely and support was reduced with the intention to phase it out by 2014. They did not even bother to test the packages under Vista. When I first opened VFP Man Studio in Vista I was shocked how slow some windows moved: haltingly and with traces like when you set traces for the mouse cursor if you've ever done it. Also they may actually bounce back to the starting place if you move them too fast.
 
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goodtyneguy

New Member
#18
Despite the welcomed and informative comments here my trouble shooting was getting me know where so I simply re-installed XP.

My laptop is now running a lot faster and probably akin to where it was when new. Having said that, it's impossible to know for certain unless one has some bench mark to test against. The cascading of the windows still occurs but only infrequently and it's not that I do anything onerous that would stress test the graphics card. I'm not a gamer and about the most taxing thing I do is play short videos of the likes of you tube and use it for java charts in my spread betting account. The graphics card - a mobility radeon 9000- has 64mbs of memory.

The other thing which annoys me is when I run Crap Cleaner it tells me to close firefox so that it can clean the interenet cache when firefox is not open i.e. it's not shown on the task bar or in task manager. I suspect it's not been cleaned from the memory or something like that? I've tried running various hardware diagnostic proggies but none of them detect anything wrong with my hardware. Very frustrating!
 
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alexBB

New Member
#19
That firefox thing is a standard offer. When I run Spybot Search and destroy it also asks me if I want to clean all temporary Internet files. Your app apparently goes a step further, it wants to reset all passwords and delete temporary Internet memory, etc. I usually allow SB S&D do it.

I am glad you've resolved the major problem. Reinstallation is another thing that helps because the system may become overburdened by software you installed, etc. The registry is bloated. Now you've got a clean start.
 
G

goodtyneguy

New Member
#20
Things are looking OK ATM, fingers crossed the old machine will keep going for a good while longer.

Thanks for the help here, it's much appreciated :)