CDRW and UDMA,
Home | Reviews and Features | Special Reports | Forums |

Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: CDRW and UDMA,

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Jamaica
    Posts
    32

    CDRW and UDMA,

    Can anyone tell me if there is such a thing as a CDRW drives that supports UDMA? can you all suggest a few? Also are there any CDRW media that you can write to over 4X?

    ------------------
    To Be or not to Be?!!!


    TBird 900mhz
    Abit KT7A-Raid
    256 mb Crucial PC133 Cas2
    ATI AIW Radeon
    SBLive X-Gamer
    10gb Maxtor HD ATA 66
    40gb IBM HD ATA 100
    Yamaha 8824 CDRW
    ACER 16X DVD
    USR 5610A Modem
    Netgear NIC
    Guess it was not to Be


    Athlon XP1500
    Soyo Dragon Plus
    512mb Crucial DDR266
    ATI AIW Radeon
    SB Audigy
    40gb Seagate HD
    40gb IBM HD
    LiteOn 48x12x48
    Pioneer 106S
    USR 5610A Modem

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    manchester (england)
    Posts
    1,030
    the yamaha crw2100 surports it and i thind you can def write cdrw at 8x these days even 10

    ------------------
    go to http://pub24.ezboard.com/bultrabytecomputingforum
    allways happy to help

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Tampa Bay, Florida, USA
    Posts
    946
    PIO4 is 16Mb/sec and faster than any burner made. It makes no performance difference which you have. On any MB made in the past few years a PIO4 drive will not slow a UDMA/ATA 66 or 100 HD on the same channel. There are important considerations to make in the purchase of a burner and I donít think that whether it is PIO or UDMA is significant.

    Just look at the CD-RW labels in the store. Many are 10X now.
    If you can keep your head while others around you are losing theirs, then there is something you don't know

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Jamaica
    Posts
    32
    Hey Slipe I see what you are saying, but isn't a DMA transfer supposed to use less CPU than PIO4 transfers? Does it really not affect UDMA 66/100 speed? I guess whether the drive can transfer at a max burst rate of 16mb/sec is not really the point... just nice to know the technology is there? It would hopefully help reduce buffer underruns..

    ------------------
    To Be or not to Be?!!!


    TBird 900mhz
    Abit KT7A-Raid
    256 mb Crucial PC133 Cas2
    ATI AIW Radeon
    SBLive X-Gamer
    10gb Maxtor HD ATA 66
    40gb IBM HD ATA 100
    Yamaha 8824 CDRW
    ACER 16X DVD
    USR 5610A Modem
    Netgear NIC
    Guess it was not to Be


    Athlon XP1500
    Soyo Dragon Plus
    512mb Crucial DDR266
    ATI AIW Radeon
    SB Audigy
    40gb Seagate HD
    40gb IBM HD
    LiteOn 48x12x48
    Pioneer 106S
    USR 5610A Modem

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    6,459
    Well DMA stands for Direct Memory Access, which means the system memory will have a direct interface with the IDE device instead of interfacing through the cpu; and thus less cpu cycles are eaten...

    I leave DMA enabled on my LiteOn 12x10x32 all the time and I never have any problems. And the transfer rates are much faster with DMA enabled.

    ------------------
    Sir, are you classified as human? Negative, I am a meat popsicle.
    My Guitar Hero 2 Xbox Live Ranking
    Main Rig (click this link for specs)
    Certified in: Nothing at all!
    Certifiable: 100% hands-on, real-world experience

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    BoB-free Zone
    Posts
    770
    The read speeds may indeed be higher, but the drive won't write any faster.

    The transfer demands placed on a properly functioning system by the up to 2400k/sec (at 16x) write speeds shouldn't be enough that DMA would be much of a factor one way or the other.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    6,459
    I never said it would write any faster- I have yet to see an IDE CDRW that burns CD's any slower in PIO-4 mode compared to DMA mode. So if you use your burner just for burning, then PIO is alright. But less cpu utilization is always good too... Go with DMA if the burner supports it.

    ------------------
    Sir, are you classified as human? Negative, I am a meat popsicle.
    My Guitar Hero 2 Xbox Live Ranking
    Main Rig (click this link for specs)
    Certified in: Nothing at all!
    Certifiable: 100% hands-on, real-world experience

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Newnan, Ga
    Posts
    486
    The write speeds, and even the read speeds of most CD-ROM's and CDRW's don't really need UDMA. I have a Ultra/Narrow SCSI CDRW (20MB/s), and the drive itself isn't even capable reaching those kinds of transfer speeds.

    Your faster CD-ROM's may benefit from enabling DMA, but I don't think you'll see any difference on a burner.

    Bart

    ------------------
    Abit BE6-II
    700MHz Pentium III@933Mhz
    256MB Mushkin PC133
    nVidia GeForce2 GTS 32MB
    WD Ultra2 10k rpm 9.1GB
    Generic 52x CD-ROM
    Tekram DC-390U2W SCSI
    Yamaha CRW8424S CD-RW SCSI-2
    Shuttle AK31v3.1 AMD XP1700+ 256MB Samsung PC2100 DDR nVidia GeForce2 GTS 32MB
    Maxtor 40GB D740X 7200RPM ATA-133 Generic 52x CD-ROM Tekram DC-390U2W SCSI Yamaha CRW8424S CD-RW SCSI-2

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Tampa Bay, Florida, USA
    Posts
    946
    You can have DMA on PIO4 Ė just not UDMA. The DMA check box is available in device manager. The Plextor 1210A has an excellent track record as a PIO4 device. There is an unauthorized jumper hack that brings it to UDMA but most owners are very happy at PIO4.

    Iím not saying UDMA isnít nice but it doesnít seem to be necessary in a quality burner. As far as it slowing a HD you can have a look at these tests of a 7200 RPM UDMA 66 Maxtor with and without a PIO4 CD-ROM on the same channel: http://www.anandtech.com/showdoc.html?i=1237&p=25
    If you can keep your head while others around you are losing theirs, then there is something you don't know

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •