How many FPS can the Human Eye Notice?
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  1. #1
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    How many FPS can the Human Eye Notice?

    A lot of the companies are flaunting their FPS, I heard that the human eye/brain can't really tell past a certain number... what is that Number? anyone Know?

  2. #2
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    pretty much anything over 30 fps is interpreted as a fluid motion... so really anything over that is icing. Any framerate over the refresh rate of your monitor is wasted (because it never gets displayed)... eg: 70 fps on a monitor refreshing at 60 hz

  3. #3
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    Keep in mind also that graphics cards are shooting for higher and higher framerates, so that they can sustain 30 fps under the most demanding operating conditions.
    No one is expected to actually 'see' the result, except through improved stability of program performance.

  4. #4
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    Just so you know movies in the theater are 24fps.

    ------------------
    The Rifter
    The Rifter

  5. #5
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    Hi all,

    Although 30fps is "fluid", 50 fps seems to be the limit to the eye's perception. Anything over 50fps is virtually impossible to notice. Some young children might be able to see 55 or in some cases 60, but by the time you're 5 or 10 years old, your eyes have grown accustomed to see life happen in "real time", not short bursts of intense images. Therefore it is nearly impossible to distinguish "real life" from anything over 50fps.

    A friend of mine's father is an optician and he was glad to school me on this. It is kind of complicated, so I've tried to simplify it here.

    Still, I don't mind playing games at over 50fps

    Ryan Yadsko
    http://www.oscarfish.com
    Ryan Yadsko
    http://www.oscarfish.com

  6. #6
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    Like Rifter said, movies are 24FPS; additionally NTSC (Don't remember PAL) television is 30 FPS. Though not a scientific method, this should give you an idea of what is perceptably smooth, as neither movies nor television appear to jerk at all.

  7. #7
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    24fps is smooth enough for general use. One of my friends insists that he can tell the difference between 30fps and 50fps, maybe it's just his imagination but it is plausible - you can see your monitor flickering if it's at 60Hz so why not. that said, the whole screen flickering is much more noticeable than a infinitesimal stutter of a game running at "only" 35fps

    Geoff

  8. #8
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    Those extra frames act more like a buffer in case of slow down. Its always good to have extra framrates

  9. #9
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    FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS FPS

    Sorry. Know its a bad joke, but I couldn't resist. Now I anticipate a string of abuse for being childish, but what the hell, i'm in a good mood today!!!!!!!!!

  10. #10
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    Hey Griffin,

    it's true, I could only see the first 24 of those.

    Col

    Just because I don't care, doesn't mean I don't understand.
    HWC members gallery
    www.hwcpics.totalserve.co.uk


  11. #11
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    60fps is the limit for the human eyes, but you won't notice the difference between 50 and 60

  12. #12
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    Apr 1999
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    Thanks folks! That puts the whole thing a bit more in perspective (only a little pun intended
    I guess I will follow up with another question though... How do you find out what the FPS IS for a given game? For instance, I have Tribes (Great game!) and I was wondering how i could find out how many FPS I was getting. Any help?

  13. #13
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    good question..I don't know

  14. #14
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    i wonder how many fps the world is moving at. like, if you're looking across the room, it looks fluid, but is your vision of real world measured in frames for seconds? anyone know?

    ------------------
    MaH SyStEm:
    PIII 450, 128 RAM, i740 (the i740 was last year's best midrange 2d card, so ha!) voodoo2 sli, 4.8X toshiba DVD, 4x4x20 cd-rw
    MaH SyStEm:
    PIII 450, 128 RAM, i740 (the i740 was last year's best midrange 2d card, so ha!) voodoo2 sli, 4.8X toshiba DVD, 4x4x20 cd-rw

  15. #15
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    There is a good reason why 60 fps and above are the present ideal and it has to do with motion blur. In real life and film motion blur is caught in the natural way so lower fps is ok. At present games don't have this and edges of moving objects are still solid.

    the increased frame rate helps smooth things out and make up for the lack of motion blur.

    The new voodoo cards will have an early implementation of this. Hopefully with futher improvements this will be the way to photo real graphics, that the industry still holds as it's main goal.

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