[RESOLVED] Fixing hard drive bad sectors
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Thread: [RESOLVED] Fixing hard drive bad sectors

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up [RESOLVED] Fixing hard drive bad sectors

    If a hard drive has some bad sectors will writing zeros to the drive ever fix these sectors? Will any software program ever fix hard drives with any amount of bad sectors? Or when they even get 4 KB of bad sectors they will always have these bad sectors no matter what you do? Or do these programs just hide these sectors so they can't be used?
    Thanks
    JB

  2. #2
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    Writing zeroes to a drive doesn't fix bad sectors. Programs that verify and correct hard drive errors do not fix bad sectors, they only mark them as unusable and hide them from users.
    Gilles Lussier

    HWC Folding@Home Team

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonny b View Post

    Will any software program ever fix hard drives with any amount of bad sectors?
    There is no software that can "fix" a worn out, damaged and/or broken hard drive. For example, if the head scrapes the platter not only is the data gone that was there, nothing can ever be stored in that spot again. Not only that, any debris from that scrape is now bouncing and flying around within the hard drive causing even more damage. Since the distance between the heads and surfaces of the platters is something like 1/10th the thickness of a human hair, when one little dinky speck of dust gets lodged up against the head, the head is going to start dragging it back and forth across the surface of the platter scraping your data off as it goes.
    Doc

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  4. #4
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    Writing zeros, is that the same as a low level format? My Digital Data Lifeguard can write Zeros in a fast version and an extended version. Is any one of these called a low level format? I do have to format after it writes zeros though in order for the hard drive to show up in My Computer list.
    Thanks
    JB

  5. #5
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    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
    \_______\. ~\ /~ ./_______/
    \_______/

  6. #6
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    Writing zeros, is that the same as a low level format?
    I've always understood these to be the same.

  7. #7
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    Seagate.com > How Do I Low-Level Format a SATA or ATA (IDE) Hard Drive?
    What does "low level format" a SATA or ATA (IDE) drive mean?

    Actually the term "low level" is a bit of a misnomer. The low-level process first used years ago in MFM hard drives bears little resemblance to what we now call a "low-level format" for today's SATA and ATA (IDE) drives.

    The only safe method of initializing all the data on a Seagate device is the zero fill erase option in SeaTools for DOS. This is a simple process of writing all zeros (0's) to the entire hard disk drive.
    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
    \_______\. ~\ /~ ./_______/
    \_______/

  8. #8
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    Recommend a tool PBD(Partition Bad Disk) to isolate bad sectors so that OS will not read/write on them. Zero-fill does not help.

  9. #9
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    If you have a drive that is developing bad sectors, you're on the downhill slope, and you can't trust your data on such a disk. What's the difference between just a few bad sectors on an otherwise okay drive and one that is failing? Run the manufacturer's diagnostic, the quick test. If it doesn't pass, you will waste more of your time on this drive than it is worth.

  10. #10
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    SpinRite ($89.00 USD) may be able to do CPR on the damaged media and bring the data back to life.
    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
    \_______\. ~\ /~ ./_______/
    \_______/

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