Hard Drive utilities
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Thread: Hard Drive utilities

  1. #1
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    Hard Drive utilities

    I have a Western Digital 500 GB Cavier Blue. I did a scan with Seagate's Seatools and right away on a quick scan I get "Failed" and on a full scan I get many errors showing up right away. So I formatted it and did a full and a quick scan with Western Digital's Data Lifeguard and the test showed up "Successful". Ok now I am strapped with, is this drive good or isn't it? Does anyone know the answer to this question?

    I am now going to try a Windows Error Check and see what that says. Do I not trust the Seatools because that is mainly for Seagates?
    Thanks
    JB

  2. #2
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    When you formatted it, did you do a full format (i.e., not the quick format)? It won't check for errors on a quick format. I would put that drive through a battery of tests before I would store important data on it.

    I use HD Tune to test/diagnose my drives.

    http://www.hdtune.com/
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  3. #3
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    Mixing the tools with different drives isn't recommended.

  4. #4
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    I agree. Select the appropriate Western Digital Diagnostic tool for your Western Digital hard drive by starting on this Western Digital Downloads page.
    Doc

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  5. #5
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    No I did not do a full format, just a quick one. I just ran chkdsk on it and it says no bad sectors. I then used Western Digital's Data Lifeguard to do a quick write zeros to the drive just now. Now I will format it again to set up the fat and maybe I will try HD Tune. So maybe Seatools can't figure out a WD drive but it sure does report errors right away though. How true is chkdsk on a drive? I always trusted it.
    Last edited by jonny b; June 21st, 2013 at 12:41 PM.
    Thanks
    JB

  6. #6
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    Hard Drive diagnostics check the drive itself, Microsoft's "chkdsk" checks the file system integrity and can fix logical file system errors. If you were running Unix, you would use "fsck" instead.
    Last edited by SpywareDr; June 21st, 2013 at 01:36 PM.
    Doc

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  7. #7
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    Seatools is handy if you have to check a Toshiba drive, since they don't provide one, but for the rest I use the manufacturer's own utility. UBCD has them all in one handy package.

  8. #8
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    I guess I am confused and not getting the right answers. Do you mean that running any hard drive diagnostics does not try to fix bad sectors or hide bad sectors or make bad sectors unusable but chkdsk does? So saying that then what does does a hard drive utility do?

    I know that Digital's Data Lifeguard for Western Digitals tells you that the test was successful. That really tells me nothing does it. So would that mean 1. the drive is bad & the test was successful or 2. the drive is good & the test was successful. -----So this does not tell you that the drive is good or bad.

    I have seen on Seatools that sometimes not always it will say during a test that hit F8 to repair bad sectors.

    So on some hard drive diagnostics the program does or doesn't try to repair or hide or make bad sectors unusable?

    It is good to know that the program that you are using does try to "let's call it, repair bad sectors" whether it repairs them or now. So this is what I use:

    Digital's Data Lifeguard
    Seatools
    DiskCheckup
    chkdsk
    Last edited by jonny b; June 21st, 2013 at 04:56 PM.
    Thanks
    JB

  9. #9
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    Hard drive diagnostics are primarily used for determining the physical condition of the hard drive, no matter which Operating System, if any, is installed on it.

    Microsoft's "chkdsk" only checks (and can sometimes fix) file system integrity on hard drives running a Microsoft Operating System.
    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
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  10. #10
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    So Western D. hd utility's scan's Success means that the test was successful or that the hard drive is a successful drive?

    I have been using chkdsk /f /r for years to determine the drive being good or bad and fixing sectors as needed. I was always satisfied with that until someone told me to use the manufacture's HD utility instead. Now I am unhappy and should just go back to chkdsk and delete all these stupid utility programs. Like I said Seatools does give the option to fix sectors with choosing that with the F8 key though.

    I guess I have to go thru the help files and read all that boring stuff again.

    Oh, by the way. Can I use the dos program two at a time. I have cables for checking two drives at the same time and wonder if they would clash. I am doing it right now and they seem to be doing their chkdsk at the same time perfectly. Just wondering.
    Thanks
    JB

  11. #11
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    Western Digital's website says this: When the test completes, you will be notified with a pass/fail message. Doesn't say anything about dealing with bad sectors.
    Thanks
    JB

  12. #12
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    The only times I've had hdd's under test and had msgs about repairing sectors, I was chasing my tail on a drive that was failing. That was years ago on Maxtor 40G drives, which I think were destined for a special section of hell. I just had a Seagate 3T drive with no more than 3 or 4 days of accumulated time on it die. Couldn't read a file, then a few minutes later gone completely.

    I think you're looking for certainty where there is none. Run the test. If it fails the quick test (aside from your anomaly of the possibly false reading with the Seagate utility on a WD drive), it's done. If it passes, it could be good for years or die tomorrow, like any other drive. That's about all anyone can say.

  13. #13
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    Microsoft.com > An explanation of CHKDSK ...
    Chkdsk.exe is the command-line interface for a program that verifies the logical integrity of a file system on Windows. When CHKDSK encounters logical inconsistencies it takes actions to repair file system data, provided it is not in read-only mode.

    The code that actually performs the verification when CHKDSK is run online resides in utility DLLs such as Untfs.dll and Ufat.dll. The verification routines invoked by Chkdsk.exe are the same ones invoked when a volume is verified through the graphical user interface provided by the Windows Explorer or Disk Administrator. When CHKDSK is scheduled to run at reboot, on the other hand, the binary module that contains the verification code is Autochk.exe. Autochk.exe is a native Windows application that runs early enough in the system boot sequence that it does not have the benefit of Virtual Memory or other Win32 services. Autochk.exe generates the same kind of textual output that the utility DLLs invoked by Chkdsk.exe does. But in addition to displaying this output on the screen during the boot process, Autochk.exe also logs an event to the Application Event Log for the system containing as much of the textual output as can fit into the event log's data buffer.

    Because Autochk.exe and the verification code in the utility DLLs used by Chkdsk.exe are based on the same source code, both will be referred to generically as "CHKDSK" throughout the remainder of this article. Likewise, ... it should be understood that, by saying, "CHKDSK does such-and-such," the following is meant: "CHKDSK does such-and-such when run on an NTFS volume".
    ...
    CHKDSK's activity is split into three major "stages" during which it examines all the "metadata" on the volume and an optional fourth stage. Metadata is "data about data." It is the file system overhead, so to speak, that is used to keep track of everything about all of the files on the volume. Metadata tells what allocation units make up the data for a given file, what allocation units are free, what allocation units contain bad sectors, and so on. The "contents" of a file, on the other hand, is termed "user data." NTFS protects its metadata through the use of a transaction log. User data is not so protected.

    During its first stage, CHKDSK displays a message on the screen saying that it is verifying files and counts from 0 to 100 percent complete. During this phase, CHKDSK examines each file record segment (FRS) in the volume's master file table (MFT). Every file and directory on an NTFS volume is uniquely identified by a specific FRS in the MFT and the percent complete that CHKDSK displays during this phase is the percent of the MFT that has been verified. During this stage, CHKDSK examines each FRS for internal consistency and builds two bitmaps, one representing what FRSs are in use, and the other representing what clusters on the volume are in use. At the end of this phase, CHKDSK knows what space is in use and what space is available both within the MFT and on the volume as a whole. NTFS keeps track of this information in bitmaps of its own that are stored on the disk allowing CHKDSK to compare its results with NTFS's stored bitmaps. If there are discrepancies, they are noted in CHKDSK's output. For example, if an FRS that had been in use is found to be corrupted, the disk clusters formerly associated with that FRS will end up being marked as available in CHKDSK's bitmap, but will be marked as being "in use" according to NTFS's bitmap.

    During its second stage, CHKDSK displays a message on the screen saying that it is verifying indexes and counts from 0 to 100 percent complete a second time. During this phase, CHKDSK examines each of the indexes on the volume. Indexes are essentially NTFS directories and the percent complete that CHKDSK displays during this phase is the percent of the total number of directories on the volume that have to be checked. During this stage, CHKDSK examines each directory on the volume for internal consistency and also verifies that every file and directory represented by an FRS in the MFT is referenced by at least one directory. It also confirms that every file or subdirectory referenced in each directory actually exists as a valid FRS in the MFT and checks for circular directory references. Finally, it confirms that the various time stamps and file size information associated with files are all up-to-date in the directory listings for those files. At the end of this phase, CHKDSK has ensured that there are no "orphaned" files and that all the directory listings are for legitimate files. An orphaned file is one for which a legitimate FRS exists, but which is not listed in any directory. When an orphaned file is found, it can often be restored to its rightful directory, provided that directory is still around. If the directory that should hold the file no longer exists, CHKDSK will create a directory in the root directory and place the file there. If directory listings are found that reference FRSs that are no longer in use or that are in use but do not correspond to the file listed in the directory, the directory entry is simply removed.

    During its third stage, CHKDSK displays a message on the screen saying that it is verifying security descriptors and counts from 0 to 100 percent complete a third time. During this phase, CHKDSK examines each of the security descriptors associated with each of the files and directories on the volume. Security descriptors contain information regarding the owner of the file or directory, NTFS permission for the file or directory, and auditing information for the file or directory. The percent complete in this case is the percent of the number of files and directories on the volume. CHKDSK verifies that each security descriptor structure is well formed and internally consistent. It does not verify that the listed users or groups actually exist or that the permissions granted are in any way appropriate.

    The fourth stage of CHKDSK is only invoked if the /R switch is used. /R is used to locate bad sectors in the volume's free space. When /R is used, CHKDSK attempts to read every sector on the volume to confirm that the sector is usable. Sectors associated with metadata are read during the natural course of running CHKDSK even when /R is not used. Sectors associated with user data are read during earlier phases of CHKDSK provided /R is specified. When an unreadable sector is located, NTFS will add the cluster containing that sector to its list of bad clusters and, if the cluster was in use, allocate a new cluster to do the job of the old. If a fault tolerant disk driver is being used, data is recovered and written to the newly allocated cluster. Otherwise, the new cluster is filled with a pattern of 0xFF bytes. When NTFS encounters unreadable sectors during the course of normal operation, it will also remap them in the same way. Thus, the /R switch is usually not essential, but it can be used as a convenient mechanism for scanning the entire volume if a disk is suspected of having bad sectors.

    The preceding paragraphs give only the broadest outline of what CHKDSK is actually doing to verify the integrity of an NTFS volume. There are many specific checks made during each stage and several quick checks between stages that have not been mentioned. Instead, this is simply an outline to the more important facets of CHKDSK activity ...

    [...continues...]
    '


    BTW, the CHKDSK "/R" parameter implies "/F".
    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
    \_______\. ~\ /~ ./_______/
    \_______/

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