[RESOLVED] MS HAL and changing components
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Thread: [RESOLVED] MS HAL and changing components

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Thumbs up [RESOLVED] MS HAL and changing components

    I run various OS's: 7, XP and Linux Mint currently (w/a hard drive tray), and am going to upgrade video, try to unlock 1 or more cpu's and possibly change motherboards. From what I understand Windows has something called the Hardware Abstraction Layer baked in that hoses your Windows OS if you change components from what gets in the list when you first install.

    It may not happen for video cards but I think it will for most anything else. Just want to be sure what I'm getting into. Both these OS's are academic versions and I don't want any screwy bs from MS. My data is backed up but all the appls and other crap would have to be reinstalled as I understand it (can't just reinstall over the original OS).

    Anyone have definite experience on this? I would think academic ver or not I at least have the right to reinstall everything if say, I changed any part or went for a new build. I've never found a cloning appl w/o detractors so I'm hoping I don't have to go thru reinstalling just for a new card and cpu, for example. I imagine unlocking a chip won't involve HAL roadblocks but then I'd be on a different mobo so same diff.


    Thanks in advance for any input,

    Mac

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
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    27,209
    End user feedbacks has been mixed.
    Some worked, others did not.

    There is no guarantee either way.
    "I know nothing."
    Cheers.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    325
    One of the first steps the Windows installation routine must do is take an inventory of the hardware in your system so that it can then assemble a Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) for that particular setup. If you later remove that hard drive and simply stick it in another system composed of different hardware, the HAL will probably be wrong.
    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
    \_______\. ~\ /~ ./_______/
    \_______/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Exactly why I posted SpywareDr. You imply the system won't boot. But as many people switch out at least a card occasionally, I wondered if they have to totally reinstall the OS and then everything else. So I should've said yes, I think the HAL will halt any changes.

    The only fix besides a reinstall I've ever heard of is contacting MS and say something died whereby they send code to your license/OS and allow a change somehow. Guess I'll chalk up Shinma's either/or as the "resolution". Thanks.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    325
    It all depends on how much of a hardware change it is. If the current Windows setup can also handle some little change, you're on your merry way.

    BTW, when you need to contact Microsoft by phone for authentication, (the phone number and a code will be on the screen), it is all automated now-a-days. Meaning you're not talking to a live human. The voice asks you a couple of questions, you simply answer (voice). It'll ask you read the numbers off of your screen, and it then gives a code to type in. That's it, your Windows is activated.

    S-o-m-e-t-i-m-e-s the automated voice will ask how many computers you have the software installed on. Tell it "one", the voice will ask you to hold for a moment (like it's trying to verify info), then it'll come back and give you the code to type in.
    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
    \_______\. ~\ /~ ./_______/
    \_______/

  6. #6
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    Vancouver, B.C., Canada
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    As far as I know, a full retail version gives you the right to reinstall as long as it's only on one system, and an OEM version is tied to the motherboard. Don't know where the academic version falls. I've read repeatedly of phone calls allowing enabling even when the motherboard is changed (as long as on one system only) despite not formally being allowed. I've also read that a video card change between brands, eg. AMD, Nvidia, or Intel, has to be handled very carefully, not for legal reasons, but in order to facilitate booting.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    325
    Yes, I have used Microsoft's phone activation to successfully reactivate/re-authenticate an OEM versions of Windows after replacing the motherboards.
    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
    \_______\. ~\ /~ ./_______/
    \_______/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    4

    hardware envy sucks

    Thanks again for the feedback guys. Glad I don't have to select best answer as all give good info.
    Still debating but figure this month's budget will determine moreso than upcoming July 4 sales.
    Gotta get going on VirtualBox for my Mint and leave MS behind.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    325
    Put Mint (Ubuntu, Slax, or whatever) on a bootable USB flash drive and carry it/them on your key ring.
    Doc

    ____________http://www.microsoft.com/security____________
    \____________________ ____.-.____ ____________________/
    \_____________\ -._)!(_.- /_____________/
    \_______\. ~\ /~ ./_______/
    \_______/

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