new video card causing boot up issues
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Thread: new video card causing boot up issues

  1. #1
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    new video card causing boot up issues

    system specs: AMD 2500+ running winXP sp3 on Soyo DragonPlus MB. 400watt PS, 768meg ram. 200gig HD.


    recently purchase a new AGP video card for my kids aging system so that they can play Sims3. replaced the current ATI radeon 9250 128megs with an eVGA nvidia 6200 256megs.

    when i first installed this video card, it would not give a video signal, just beeps. so i took it out of the agp slot to make sure the contacts were clean and reinserted it, but the computer still wouldn't boot, so i pull it out again and cleaned the agp slots. still would not boot or video. i then unplugged the computer from the wall waited a few minutes, plugged it in and then it booted fine.. though slowly. The system is stable once it is up and running, and i installed the latest video drivers.

    but now each time i need to turn on the computer, i have to unplug it from the wall and re-plug it again before it boots up again. if i reinsert the old ATI card, I don't have this problem and it boots normally.

    any ideas?

  2. #2
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    You may want to check the capacitors in the power supply to see that they are okay. And, if you can try another power supply, you might try that as well.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Your PSU is showing signs of aging. I suspect that it can no longer supply the necessary current to start up the computer. During cold boot up, the PSU is required to momentarily supply a specified peak current that is higher than the normal rated current during normal operation to boot up a computer. Failure to do so will result in boot up failure. By unplugging the PSU, the protection circuitry inside the PSU is reset and if it is not too severe, one can successfully start up the computer.

    Some hardware will require more start up current to successfully boot such as high end video cards and 16 phase or more voltage regulator motherboards. Hence the need for higher rated PSUs. For a Quad SLI system, a 1000w PSU is recommended although the peak power under full load is less than that since a lower rated PSU cannot deliver the peak current during boot up because the protection circuitry will automatically shutdown the PSU.

    From my experience running 24/7 crunching Prime95, an Enermax PSU will last 18 months of continuous use while a Gigabyte PSU will last only 8 months before having the symptom that you are facing now.

    Not too sure about the voltage circuitry between ATi and Nvidia, but I'm guessing that Nvidia is using a more complex multiphase voltage regulator on their cards since they have a lower power use under full load in spite of ATi using a smaller chip fabrication process. The only down side to this is a much higher start up current requirement during boot up.

    A replacement PSU would be highly recommended.
    "Believe me! The secret of reaping the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment from life is to live dangerously!"
    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  4. #4
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    but I'm guessing that Nvidia is using a more complex multiphase voltage regulator on their cards since they have a lower power use under full load in spite of ATi using a smaller chip fabrication process
    From comments I've read at SPCR, the more phases a motherboard ps and voltage regulation section has, the higher the power draw. They are capable of powering the higher wattage cpus, but not so efficient on the lower ones.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanceMan View Post
    From comments I've read at SPCR, the more phases a motherboard ps and voltage regulation section has, the higher the power draw. They are capable of powering the higher wattage cpus, but not so efficient on the lower ones.
    A 16 phase VRM running all 16 phases at idle would be inefficient and have a higher power draw than a 3 phase VRM mobo. That's why they have dynamic phase enabling to match the current load to ensure optimum efficiency from low to full load. Only a few phases are enabled during idle and the full 16 phase running at full load.

    Each mobo design have different methods both software and hardware for implementing dynamic phase enabling so the overall power consumption and efficiency varies with different mobos during idle and load.

    Not sure about using high and low wattage cpus on these boards but if there are efficiency differences I think it would be small. Yet to see a review site publish any data on this. Overall, the hardware setup and how the system is used or tested plays a bigger factor IMHO. The mains power outlet voltage used (110V or 240V) and PSU efficiency also affects the overall power consumption to some degree.

    Intel's P55 Express chipset - Tech Report

    The link shows power consumption figures for an 8 phase, 16 phase and 24 phase VRM mobo. With software and BIOS updates I think further improvements can be made.

    The mobos are tested using a PC Power & Cooling Silencer 750W PSU.

    I dunno if a typical lower rated PSU is capable of reliably powering up the review setups for a period of time. They all don't exceed 500W under full load. Perhaps a review site will find it interesting enough to check and publish a test report.
    "Believe me! The secret of reaping the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment from life is to live dangerously!"
    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  6. #6
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    Ratt, thanks for that information. Great link. I'm surprised to see the amount of difference between brands at idle.

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