France gets the first fusion reactor
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  1. #1
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    France gets the first fusion reactor

    I thought this was quite topical after the recent Chernobyl thread.

    After 18 months of bickering, it looks like France have beaten Japan in the battle to host the Iter fusion reactor.

    However, the sweetener for Japan is that if Iter is a success, they will get the first commercial reactor. Plus they are getting a nice financial kickback in the meantime.

    Full article HERE

    I really hope scientists can make fusion work, it would be an amazing acheivement.
    They apparently have to create temperatures of 100 million degrees celsius (ten times hotter than the core of the sun) because the pressure is so much lower than in the sun.
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  2. #2
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    "Governments should not waste our money on a dangerous toy which will never deliver any useful energy. Instead, they should invest in renewable energy which is abundantly available, not in 2080 but today."



    What a load of crap, nuclear fusion, when achieved, will be the most efficient, over time cleanest, and BY FAR cheapest compared to any other sort of energy production we know today. Its the end-all of energy shortages that we can even theorize right now- well maybe cold fusion would be at top


    I wouldnt call this the first yet- The states have the Z-machine, which is a fusion reactor- but its only desinged to work for fractons of seconds

    No doubtedly much of the reasearch going into this new france reactor comes from the Z machine and the other one this planet has, i cant remember where though (germany?)

    This sounds like the first real attempt to make a sustainable supply from fusion power- if this thing works be ready for HUGE changes in our world. Street lights could run the length of all roads- getting power for it all wouldnt be a problem. In fact, our electrical infastructre would be the onlyting limiting on the amount of juice we can use. I imagine electricity being used in multiple volumes even compared to today, with our bill actually going down. Between this, and hydrogen fuel cells, finally we can see the light at the end of the energy-usage tunnel. I could see, in another 100 years there wont be any need to conserve power anymore- all of that energy star stuff probably wont even be required anymore.

  3. #3
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    Originally posted by krupted
    I could see, in another 100 years there wont be any need to conserve power anymore- all of that energy star stuff probably wont even be required anymore.
    It's not because energy is costless that it would be costless to waste it.
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  4. #4
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    Originally posted by krupted



    I wouldnt call this the first yet- The states have the Z-machine, which is a fusion reactor- but its only desinged to work for fractons of seconds

    No doubtedly much of the reasearch going into this new france reactor comes from the Z machine and the other one this planet has, i cant remember where though (germany?)

    This sounds like the first real attempt to make a sustainable supply from fusion power- if this thing works be ready for HUGE changes in our world. Street lights could run the length of all roads- getting power for it all wouldnt be a problem. In fact, our electrical infastructre would be the onlyting limiting on the amount of juice we can use. I imagine electricity being used in multiple volumes even compared to today, with our bill actually going down. Between this, and hydrogen fuel cells, finally we can see the light at the end of the energy-usage tunnel. I could see, in another 100 years there wont be any need to conserve power anymore- all of that energy star stuff probably wont even be required anymore.
    oh yeah there are a few around already, the one in europe is called Tokamak, I believe. There is a small one in the UK too, I think.

    The difference with these is that they all require much more energy to keep the fusion process running than they actually give back, which is not really a great deal of use to anyone. Because of this they are only run for fractions of a second at a time.

    The aim with Iter, although not designed to be a commercial reactor, is to create a fusion process which is comnmercially viable and repeatable on a larger scale.
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  5. #5
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    ah, i see the difference now- thanks for the clarity.


    ponch- yes, but if, i mean when they figure out this fusion power the way they know it can be then it would be virtually costless. I watched a special on it, i dont remember the details but the amount of energy these things could produce would be limitless in our standards. Its really exciting, its going to change so many things on the commerical/industrial side of things, which trickels down to consumers. everything will be a little cheaper

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    So, I dont get how it actually works. This stuff can just keep producing power forever?

  7. #7
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    it's essentially like producing a star on earth - when refined it should generate a lot of energy. It relies on fusing, rather than splitting atoms. Unfortunately the temperature required to do this is 100 million degrees, which would obviously burn straight through the side of the reactor vessel and anything else it touched. So they have to contain the reaction within a very powerful torus (donut) - shaped magnetic field.

    There are other attractions though - one is that it's inherently safe - no control rods , moderators or emergency shutdown systems are needed, as if the power went off, then the reaction would just stop.

    Also, while not completely waste free, fusion produces much smaller amounts of lower-level waste than the many tons of high-level waste that fission produces.
    Last edited by dannyboy27; July 1st, 2005 at 04:01 AM.
    Windows 7 x64 Ultimate Edition, Gigabyte Z77-D3H, Ivy Bridge i7 3770, nVidia GTX480 1.5Gb, 16Gb Corsair 1600MHz, Creative X-Fi, Seagate 500Gb SATA II, DGM 23" Widescreen TFT

    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" -Blaise Pascal

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