Intel to put an end to overclocking...
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  1. #1
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    Intel to put an end to overclocking...

    I don't know how much faith to put into this, since it is The Inquirer, but have a look...

    http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=8518

    Now I remember why I like AMD so much. *Hugs unlocked 2500+*
    If pro is the opposite of con, what's the opposite of progress?

  2. #2
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    The article doesn't say that Intel will prevent users overclocking their computers at all. Note that I use both Intel and AMD processors and Intel processors, even if locked, overclocked as much as, if not more than AMD processors.

    Also note that recent processors from AMD, except for mobile cpus, are multiplier locked.
    Gilles Lussier

    HWC Folding@Home Team

  3. #3
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    That story is from March 2003. It's not exactly news.

  4. #4
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    I didn't check the date. Just saw it posted on the AMDMB forums today. The article does say that it would prevent overclocking though, because it would detect a difference in speed vs what default speed is. Who knows... let's hope it doesn't happen because AMD might start locking all their stuff from now on.
    If pro is the opposite of con, what's the opposite of progress?

  5. #5
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    I sent [H]ardOCP an e-mail a few days ago. They were talking about how well their board overclocked and had heard the rumours and wanted to shut them down, but Intel is trying to stop overclocking the bus again. I'll just dump the e-mail here:

    [quote]The rumors I am hearing is that it is locked with just a registry setting for the current stepping (A). From what I gather the next stepping (B1) is not able to be turned off with a simple registry hack and will restrict your over-clocking to a 5-10% range. According to Tomís hardware, some of the board manufacturers have found ways to cheat the lock (ASUS and GigaByte and likely Abit), but likely Intel will struggle to fill this hole by the B2 stepping. They are really putting an effort to a bus lock finally and after a few tries will likely manage it.[quote]

    Here is the link to Tom's Hardware:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/motherbo...et_775-23.html

    And this is the juicy bit:

    This time, the chip giant not only cuts away functions that are regarded as non-essential, but it is actively adjusting hardware in order to prevent the industry (and as a consequence, the users) from anticipating upcoming features like DDR2-667 and FSB 1066.

    Of course we tried to get some DDR2-667 DIMMs in order to see what they can do. The small memory makers do not have these chips yet, while the big ones claimed not to have any samples for the press. Interesting, however, is the fact that a well known memory specialist will launch its DDR2-667 memory as early as July 7.

    Anyways, as long as there is no chipset that supports DDR2-667, these fast DDR2 DIMMs only make sense if users can overclock their systems. What Intel did is implement an overclocking limiter to the MCH chips: If the CPU clock exceeds the threshold (we determined that this is 10% over specification), the required PLL (Phase Lock Loop) will reset and won't refuse to lock that frequency. Basically that is a very simple way of throwing a spanner in the works, as it causes a system crash. Decent motherboards automatically restart and you may try again. The easy way would be to limit all overclocking ambitions to 10% max, but now that Intel added this extra obstacle, I somehow felt compelled to break some barriers.

    With the chipset's A stepping, a register could be used to remove the overclocking lock. The current stepping (B1), however, does not allow for the 'feature' to be disabled any more.

    However, we know of two motherboard makers that have already managed to override the overclocking limiter successfully: Asus and Gigabyte. And it isn't really difficult, but it's a shame to think that smaller manufacturers simply don't have enough manpower make such a venture possible.

    Usually, the PLL is initialized at system startup in order to lock the frequency that is stored in BIOS. Here's where we need to start, since it won't lock frequencies that exceed the internal limiter. Intel accomplished this by linking the PLL to the assertion time of the Northbridge reset signal.

    After adding a little hardware modification, the two companies mentioned above managed to pass control over the PLL ready time to the BIOS. Each frequency has a different PLL locking time that the BIOS software needs to be aware of. Based on that information, the BIOS will now adjust the period of time the system remains in reset mode until the PLL successfully locks the clock.
    The good thing is that ASUS and GigaByte (and according to [H]ardOCP... Abit too) have =found a way to by-pass the lock, but this will make it harder for some board makers to include this feature, so less overclockable boards will be out there. It also means Intel is trying harder to lock the bus and they might impliment better locks with each stepping. They just might succeed in locking the thing. That would piss off many overclockers out there... maybe they will just have to get a 90nm Athlon64 and overclock the snott out of that.
    AMD Phenom II x4 945 3Ghz | ASUS M4A77TD | 2X WD 1TB SATA 2 hard drive | 2x2GB Corsair XMS3 | nVidia GeForce 8800 GTS | ATI TV Wonder Theater Pro 550 | Antec P-160 case | Antec 650w Earth Watts | LG Blu-ray Super Drive | LG DVD RW | Windows 7 Pro

  6. #6
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    Ohh, and this is what [H]ardOCP had to say:

    We have seen a few folks rumoring about Intel overclocking locks but we have yet to see any official information on this from Intel and the fact of the matter is that it does not exist on our ABIT motherboards.

    I donít want to get into an overclocking article here and now, as the CPUs we have are engineering samples. Obtaining overclocks in the 4GHz range were not an issue though. Also, we were able to scale our FSB up to 250+ while bringing the DDR2 bus up to 666MHz with all sets of DDR2 sticks in the house. So it would seem that the enthusiast fun would live on in the new enthusiast motherboards. It is certain that the ABIT retail boards have great promise of being awesome OCers now as they have in the past.

    It would be my guess that many of our readers will reach 1066MHz FSB bus rates and 667MHz DDR2 speeds long before we officially see the specs on equipment and before the market officially offers 4GHz CPUs. Of course the idea is to do that as inexpensively as possible and we will certainly focus on that soon.
    http://www.hardocp.com/article.html?art=NjMwLDg=

    Two very conflicting reports, but Tom's seems to have more accurate informasion about what is going on, not just "Abits is not locked". Kyle is usually a bit better about these things.
    AMD Phenom II x4 945 3Ghz | ASUS M4A77TD | 2X WD 1TB SATA 2 hard drive | 2x2GB Corsair XMS3 | nVidia GeForce 8800 GTS | ATI TV Wonder Theater Pro 550 | Antec P-160 case | Antec 650w Earth Watts | LG Blu-ray Super Drive | LG DVD RW | Windows 7 Pro

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