Antec TrueBlue 480W Problems
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Thread: Antec TrueBlue 480W Problems

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    2

    Unhappy Antec TrueBlue 480W Problems

    Somewhat of a newbie question I guess, as it's been awhile (7 years) since I last built a PC for myself...my apologies in advance if this isn't the correct forum.

    Do the new power supplies, such as the Antec listed in the subject line, have to be connected to the MB for them to demonstrate any power (e.g., to even have the fans spin)?

    I'm getting parts in sporadically to build my PC and wanted to test the PS I just received before its too late to return. Shouldn't the fans at least come on without the PS being hooked up to anything (other than the 110 outlet obviously)?

    I'm afraid I got one DOA...I get nothing from it, but then I thought maybe the new PSs require a complete connection to the MB before they come on.

    Thanks in advance...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    2

    The answer is 'Yes' they must be connected

    Sorry to take up room in this forum with my posting...I found the answer at a FAQ at www.hardwaresecrets.com

    Info below:

    What do I have to do in order to test (turn on) ATX power supplies outside the computer's case, without having to connect it to a motherboard? ATX power supplies seem to turn on only when connected to a motherboard!

    To turn on an ATX power supply without having to plug it to a motherboard, just ground the PS-ON signal from the power supply, i.e. conect the PS-ON signal (pin 14) to ground (pins 3, 5, 7, 13, 15, 16 or 17). Usually the PS-ON is connected to a green wire, so you will have to conect the power suply's green wire to the black wire, through a small wire or an opened paper clip.


    Remember that many times the power supply indicate correct voltages when tested with a multitester, but it doen't work well when connected to the system. The most usual defect of power supplies is the incapacity of supplying too much current. In this case, the values of the voltages will seem to be ok, but the PC won't work correctly (typical symptoms include ramdom resets and ramdom turn offs). So, the most secure way to test a power supply is by substitution.

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