Asus v8200 GF3 Ram w/b build, ( just call me Rotor ;-) - Page 2
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Thread: Asus v8200 GF3 Ram w/b build, ( just call me Rotor ;-)

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moncton, NB Canada
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    328
    Amazing work. Glad I could help just a little in the project. I think I'm in love with your camera.

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  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
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    East Texas
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    2,951
    I've never seen one in person, so don't ream me too bad. Aren't the core and memory modules the same height? If they are, wouldn't it have been easier to have a single block cooling the core and RAM? Since you're obviously going to have a block on the core of your fan-less system, it seems more logical to have as few connections as possible. A single block on the video card would cut out two connectors, but I could be wrong.

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    Opteron 148@2805(255x11-1.4v)
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  3. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Norwich, UK
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    3,790
    When I first saw Rotor's cooling I was but it looks like I've caught the bug too. Thanks also goes to those that have helped me with the pulse gen part of this project cyril1, CALV & others, because electronics is definitely not my field.

    I just wanted people here to see there really are no expensive special tools required to make stuff like this, just a plan, design, some tools & effort.

    NewBlackDak

    I had looked into a one piece heatsink but the ram and GPU are unfortunately at different levels. It could still be done but I decided against it due to possible poor GPU to heatsink contact. The extra connections are not a problem as I'll have a manifold due to all the other water-cooled items.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Kingston, England
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    595
    i was going to say HA! you should have milled the channel inside, but then i realised that it was actually a damn good idea to have it like it is, get much better surface area contact = better cooling! so then i would obviously just look silly if i said that :P
    I've always wondered if you had to use water, coz it ionizes and makes ions which is what make it conduct water, therefore making it dangerous to have in a PC (duh!) so is there some type of un-ionised water or some other liquid with the same sort of specific heat capacity and fluidity that doesnt condut elctricity? it would make things so much safer, unless you overheated due to coolant loss rather than merely shorting everything and electrocuting yourself!
    What do you plan to do about cooling the power supply? I think those indicator LEDs require a bit of cooling too CD-Rom? floppy? clock gen?
    put a window in your case - it would be a shame for all that fantastic work to go unrecognized by the casual observer.
    keep up the great work!
    someone tell #rotor that bladerunner is stealing his spot

    O

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  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Norwich, UK
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    I would have milled it if I could, (I like it neat even if I can't see it). As my water temp will be around 10C give or take it wont require extra surface area or slower flow for heat transfer. The whole block will become water temp quickly so absorbing any small amount of heat the ram creates, The water, (or coolant to be correct), flows directly on the copper baseplate which is 2mm thick the other side will be in contact with the ram. I don't think it will matter, anyhow I've sealed it now and ran tap water through it, gets to water temp pretty quick ), especially the copper baseplate.

    The best way to ensure no water/electronics mix in side the PC is to make damn sure it can't leak to the best of your ability. I'm looking into using some pneumatic pipe fittings in the future, (rated at 10 bar air pressure), as I'm not 100% happy about the push on type unions with plastic pipe myself. A pure alcohol coolant based system could work but it would be expensive and I'd only drink it.

    The PSU is a bit more tricky as I'm not sure about all the components that will require cooling, output transistors on the heatsinks and the transformer I know but there could be other things getting hot when you remove the airflow. I did have a talk with Rotor about this in the past. Good point about the clock gen. forgotten about that, a passive sink glued on with artic silver epoxy should suffice.

    couple more pics for all you image junkies like me




  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    New Brunswick NJ USA
    Posts
    79
    I've been wanting to get into water cooling because, frankly, it facinates me. I love building things (this is why I'm an engineering student I think) and I've been reading bits and pieces of articles and what not on the web to find out more about it. I have the science of it, down to the mathmatics in my head. But the know-how of building it etc is just not there.

    There are pros and cons about this thread:

    Pro: Just gets me more excited about actually doing it when I finally learn.

    Con: The shear enormity of the project and knowledge of what I don't know is overwelling.

    Thanks BladeRunner,
    You might be responsible for turning me into a junkie!

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    [This message has been edited by ThunderSix (edited 07-01-2001).]
    T-Bird 800@1000
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    WD 7200rpm 30gig HD
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    -----
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  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Washington, PA USA
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    1,930
    Nice keyboard.. looks like the one I have

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  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    493
    Huh?
    I would love for you to come have a word with our machine shop CnC machinests, the quality you have aquired surpases most items that I have ever seen. WTF did you polish all the surfaces with?.
    2nd xcan we see the final finished assembly sat direct onto the core/mem.
    Cheers
    .....Jess

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    My PC has an attitude problem, alright!...

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Norwich, UK
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    3,790
    I'd love some CNC equipment. I just used some metal files to get it to the shape I wanted. To finish I used varying grades of wet & dry, (wet), working down to a final 1200 grade. To get the finished shine you can't beat good old original T-Cut colour restorer and AutoGlym silicon resin car polish to finish. It takes time but you can do it while sitting watching TV . I then finished by spray coating it with cellulose clear lacquer to prevent the metal tarnishing.

    Finished pics will be up soon hopefully, check this thread for a recent update. <A HREF="http://discussions.hardwarecentral.com/Forum11/HTML/015882.html" TARGET=_blank>Asus v8200 GF3 water-cooling part 2 (GPU)
    </A>


  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Santa Clara, CA / Baltimore, MD USA
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    1,992
    not only does he have machining skills, bladerunner also posseses ms paint skills

    nicely done

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  11. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    London, UK
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    955
    Even better than what my old metal work teacher at school could produce

    How long did that take you?
    Athlon XP 3200+, TT Silent Boost (its rubbish as well as loud) Gigabyte nForce2 mobo (stable but lacks tweaking options), GF4 Ti4200 128mb, Lian-Li V2000

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    UK, North east
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    362
    How on earth did you cut those pieces out of one block? surely not with a Junior hacksaw...

    Those are so straight

    mojo

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Hretta, gRATTE
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    1
    This is really great work ! I just love it. If I would have the guts to have water hoses in my computer, I would try to build it.

    Just a thought..
    What about using underpressure to transport the water instaid of overpressure? Using a pump to suck the water out of the cooler and watertank. If there would be a leak, air would go in your water and not water in your computer..

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1
    Whoa, nice piece of work.
    Ok, just want to say something about water on different computer components (graphic cards, CPU,...). It is not harmfull - when i started with water cooling, i wasn't enough careful. This resulted in water on graphic card and cpu. End - wiped it off, let it dried over night, plugged it in the next day and it worked. So i conclude - water doesn't destroy your components, it just disables them.

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    Addicted to overclock.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Norwich, UK
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    Sucking water through the system still wouldn't totally avoid water getting out if it leaked. It is also worse in the fact that if you get an air leak in the system, (a leak small enough to let air in might not let water out) you will still get air in the pump, and water-blocks and flow would stop...... not good! Also most of the centrifugal aquarium pumps won't work to well with suction either.

    My cooling system will not be pressurised as such, (under slight atmospheric of course), but the pump will be circulating the coolant in a similar way to a domestic central heating system.

    Leaks are something you have to deal with the best you can during the build to hopefully ensure it wont happen. Water can destroy electronic components, count yourself very lucky if you recovered something that was leaked on.

    I made sure the plastic pipes I used were very very hard to get on the barbs, so hard I got sore fingers doing it, and I also pressure test all my water blocks with compressed air at 2 bar (28psi) for about a week immersed in water. Even this wont guarantee a leak free system for ever, but it is the best I can do.

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