CPU Heat + Case = Good oven to bake cookies
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Des Moines, IA USA
    Posts
    10

    CPU Heat + Case = Good oven to bake cookies

    I have watched these boards for quite some time and have been learning a lot. I was even compelled to build my own machine! So I did. Now this was about 7-8 months ago...but I purchased parts from everywhere. I bought a barebones system off of Ebay for cheap (big mistake). The MoBo is something generic with onboard sound and seller included an AMD 900 Mhz CPU (TBird). I thought it was a great deal so I bought it! Well the Mobo and CPU seemed fine but the case was so small that the PSU sat RIGHT on top of the HSF/CPU. Therefore this created big time heat problems. My processor at one point went up to 78 degrees Celsius and just under 200 F (This was after playing Starcraft for about an hour). Needless to say I yanked out the PSU and sat it on top of the case and bought a fan at Wal-Mart to blow directly on the case. Well this cured things temporarily. Temps remained still somewhat high after playing games. Just tonight I bought a freakin' HUGE Full Tower case with about 9 Expansion bays, 400W PSU, etc. This way the PSU would be above the CPU and MoBo and the case temp would be lower allowing more airflow. Well the stock HSF seems to do a good job and I bought a nice case fan to slap on the front of the case. Now here comes the crappy part. Well after the 'transfer of cases' and slapping the walls together on the case the CPU temp shot up to 68 Celsius from just being idle! It's like nothing even made a difference! I have no idea what there is left to do. So right now I am sitting here with a HUGE case by my side with one of the walls off and the same #$@! Wal-Mart fan blowing into the case to cool the sucker down. Is their something screwy with the CPU? If underclocking can lower the heat and keep the CPU stable, how is this done? I am at the end of my rope with this thing. So if anyone has suggestions other than using it for making smores let me know!

    SillyClown

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    British.Columbia
    Posts
    924
    You've made a great first step by purchasing a large new case!

    Now, since it is large, adding another case fan (80mm+) certainly won't hurt. I'm sure you can see some holes on the front, back, or even sides where an extra fan or two could be attached.

    Now, the important thing for AMD CPUs is a proper heatsink/fan and thermal compound. This will cost ya, but not much compared to the overall cost of your system.

    Get yourself a decent heatsink. I recommend a Global WBK38. It's aluminum, not copper, but if your major intention is to lower temps it will suit you fine. Slap on a good fan, which should come with the heatsink, and you're all set. Now, if you want to overclock or cool things even further, purchase a copper based heatsink, such as an Alpha 8045, Thermalright (correct?) SK-6, or Swiftech 462, with an appropriately sized fan.

    Third step would be to add some thermal compound. This is a MUST for AMD CPUs to remain cool. I personally recommend Arctic Silver II, but if all you can acquire is standard thermal paste, it'll do.

    (Oh, and let's not forget ambient room temperature! If your PC is in a hot room, you're not going to make much headway.)

    Hope this helps. Sorry for the large response, but I wanted to include everything I could come up with

    ------------------
    Tbird XP 1700
    WBK38 w/Sanyo Denko 92MM fan
    Asus A7V133
    256PC133
    Quantum 7200 ATA-100 20GB
    Fujitsu 5400 ATA-66 10GB
    SB Live MP3+ 5.1
    Creative Annihilator 2 GeForce2 GTS 32MB
    I Love SucksBox
    XP 1700
    WBK38 w/Sanyo Denko 92MM fan
    Asus A7V133 rev7
    256PC133
    Quantum 7200 ATA-100 20GB
    Fujitsu 5400 ATA-66 10GB
    SB Live MP3+ 5.1
    Creative Annihilator 2 GeForce2 GTS 32MB
    CTX 21"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    12
    First off get a beer. Second do every thing Kozakowski said. He summed it up about as good as it gets.

    ------------------
    Im not selling crack
    Im not selling crack

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Des Moines, IA USA
    Posts
    10
    Hmmm....I know that the HSF came with the little thermal pad underneath to help with the heat...but I was looking at the actual CPU and it appears on all four corners of it there are these very small round black 'pads'
    . I never noticed them before but it appears to somewhat 'cushion' the heatsink when it sets on top of the CPU. I thought that there are to be no gaps between the CPU and the HSF? Maybe that is where the problem is at. I will be applying some thermal grease this evening and removing the 'black pads' to see if that does the trick. The thermal pad that was on the HSF is almost non existent since the CPU gets so hot.

    Ooh one more question (i know...sorry no more after this, I promise): When applying thermal grease how in the world do u get rid of the residue on the CPU from the thermal pad melting on the core? I am not wanting to damage the thing so I would like to know the best way to get that gum-like substance off. Please fill me in!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    British.Columbia
    Posts
    924
    SillyClown, stop dead in your tracks!! DO NOT REMOVE THOSE BLACK PADS buddy...unless you want to squish your CPU!!

    Those pads are for the exact reason you pointed out, which is for the heatsink to rest on when tightly strapped to the motherboard. There are some 25lbs of pressure on that CPU! Those pads are designed to take some of that pressure from the ceramic based chip.

    Now, if you look at your CPU, you can see the core (black square with numbers on it) sits a little higher than the rest of the cpu. Those pads squish to about the same level as that core, allowing the heatsink to stay in perfect contact with it.

    To remove the thermal pad (pink stuff), simply take a credit card or guitar pick, and gently scrape it off (ensuring it's gentle enough not to scratch the underside of the heatsink). It also helps if you place the heatsink into the freezer for a few mins.

    When you apply thermal grease, do not apply too much. A good coting will consist of no more than what you can dab on with the end of a toothpick. Trust me, it'll be enough You can use your finger, or (as I do) use a guitar pick to spread the compound all over the core. Or, you can do the same on the heatsink, it's your choice here. (For the heatsink, apply the compound to the same area where the core would touch, and you're all set.)

    Hope this gets you back on track, and I do hope you didn't remove those pads and tried to install your heatsink. Yikes!

    ------------------
    Tbird XP 1700
    WBK38 w/Sanyo Denko 92MM fan
    Asus A7V133
    256PC133
    Quantum 7200 ATA-100 20GB
    Fujitsu 5400 ATA-66 10GB
    SB Live MP3+ 5.1
    Creative Annihilator 2 GeForce2 GTS 32MB
    I Love SucksBox

    [This message has been edited by Kozakowski (edited 11-15-2001).]
    XP 1700
    WBK38 w/Sanyo Denko 92MM fan
    Asus A7V133 rev7
    256PC133
    Quantum 7200 ATA-100 20GB
    Fujitsu 5400 ATA-66 10GB
    SB Live MP3+ 5.1
    Creative Annihilator 2 GeForce2 GTS 32MB
    CTX 21"

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