The best board for overclocking?
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Thread: The best board for overclocking?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
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    The best board for overclocking?

    I figure to buy a new mobo is the only way. My ASUS P2B-F is pissing me off. Can't even run at 504 stable. So I ask please, tell me the best mobo to get for overclocking?

    P3-450
    256MB (125MHz) RAM
    NVidia TNT2 ULTRA
    Maxtor 10.1GB 7200
    Creative 5X DVD
    SB Live.

    What'r my options?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
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    3,198
    The best mobos for PIII 450 O/C are ones with the VIA Apollo Pro 133 chipset. The 1/2 AGP divider lets you run your TNT2 card on spec (66 MHz) at the 133 MHz FSB. It also provides for asynchronous SDRAM operation - your PC100 SDRAM can run at 100 MHz with the FSB set to 133 MHz. These two features give you a really good chance at 600 MHz. They've also got lots of FSBs, ATA-66, core voltage adjustments, all the necessary O/C features. You're gonna probably need an Alpha though to cool that CPU down.

    The two best available are from Soyo and Aopen. I recommend the Soyo SY-6VBA133 since it's only $79 at www.mwave.com .
    1.Old Antec Case, Asus PC-DL, 2 x 1.6 LV D1 Xeons @ 3 GHz, 2GB Corsair PC3200 @ 200 MHz, Chaintech 6800 128MB AGP

    2. Old Crap Beige Case, Gigabyte GA-H55M-S2H, Core i3 530, 4GB CL8 OCZ DDR3-1600, eVGA GTX465

    3. Asus Pundit mATX Case, MSI AMD Zacate E350/dual core E350IS-E45 mini-ITX, 4GB CL9 Crucial Ballistix DDR3-1333, LG Blu Ray/HD DVD & DVD Burner

  3. #3
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    ABIT BE6-II is the best slot 1 board.
    Their website said "Requires Linux Distrubution based on kernel 2.4.2 or better," so I went and installed FreeBSD.

  4. #4
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    ABIT BE6-II is the best slot 1 board.
    Their website said "Requires Linux Distrubution based on kernel 2.4.2 or better," so I went and installed FreeBSD.

  5. #5
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    I have the ASUS P2B-F mobo also. I like it. I myself had problems getting to 504 stable and I found out (through this Discussion group) that my problem was not my motherboard. It was my RAM. I traded ram with a friend and was able to go to 558MHz easy. I could have got to 600MHz with voltage adjustments. There is a web site on how to do this. I have to look for it and I will post it. If you see Superdigg around here he will tell you that he likes his ASUS mobo also. He is the one that helped me out a lot. I guess what I am saying is that there are other things to look at before you go buy another mother board. It may not help you. However that board that Dave_B described sure does sound nice.
    Check out other topics by Goffenhiemer. I have a similar setup as you do and they may help. They are a few days old.
    Help me out here Superdigg. Defend the ASUS P2B-f.

    ------------------
    Error: CPU speed is too fast.
    -Goff

  6. #6
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    If you're running a SCSI system then I would recommend the Abit BF6, if not, then the Abit BE6-II is your best bet!
    ? Quantum Physics ? Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

  7. #7
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    Hey goffenhiemer you are quite right. Tuxy, your mobo is most likely not your problem, the P2B-F are a very stable board, the only sad thing is that you don't have voltage tweaks. I don't recommend the VIA Apollo 133's, they do have an AGP 1/2 divider but performance sucks, if you are going to buy a new motherboard wait for the Intel Solano's or i815, which are the new series of low-cost mobos too fight off VIA, they support 133Mhz FSB and RAM as well as 4xAGP. They are scheduled for release in january BTW. There are several other things that can hold you back:
    -AGP speed to high, even though not likely it should work up to 83Mhz
    -Cooling, but even with the stock cooling you should be able to do 558 (Intel sells their P3 600B(4.5x133) with stock cooling...)
    -RAM, you say you have 125Mhz RAM. Are you sure? I have never heard of that before.
    -PCI speed, try using those with a 1/4 divider and keep under 33Mhz
    That should be the most important I think, but check your RAM (how many ns it's at), when you can't do more than 504 it sound strange.

  8. #8
    For the love of GOD!
    ABIT!
    BE6-2, BF6

  9. #9
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    10ns pc-100 is suppost to be good to 125 mhz, I've read this many times, but I would not say this is true if you have generic dimms. If you have a name brand(look on the individual dimms,) then you should be fine up to 125, If you have 8ns, then the above is true also, only 133 is the top. True, pc133, is ussually 7 or 7.5ns, but I have built some systems with pc133 and they were also 8ns. Just look for quality companies on the chips, like; NEC or Texas Ins. Still, this is sometimes not the best way to identify quality sticks, since some dimms are defective and some generic manufactures buy defective dimms and place them on there sticks.. The bottom line is if you dont know where it came from then it might not be what you think... good luck!
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  10. #10
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    all i have to say is ABIT, it doesnt matter which one
    they are all good B"whatever"6 (examples: BH6, BX6, BE6 - well you get the point )
    Estimated time it will take me to fix your computer:
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  11. #11
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    Thanks guys for the support; goffenhiemer
    I'm really interested on how you can go about clocking using my existing board. And I do have an ALPHA which is why not being able to overclock is so upsetting. But Believe I have sufficient cooling for video card, CPU, HD, case. I've taken all your tips and I've created quite a nice PC. Too bac there wasn't a OC'utility for ASUS boards to make things easier.

  12. #12
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    What about the ABIT bf6, I too am going to update soon, and I have read that this board has fsb settings from 83-200 in 1mhz increments as well as asyncronous sdram timings, I'm not sure about AGP multipliers though, any suggestions?
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
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    I do agree. The best mobo at this time for overclocking is the ABIT BE6-2 (not the BE6). I have this system from Nortek Computers which uses the BE6-2 mobo and it SCREAMS! It's a fully loaded overclocked PIII600. Super-cooled by a patented technology. I love it!!!
    Check the systems out. There address is www.nortek.on.ca/nortek/blackline.htm

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
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    Marc_C,

    Go peddle somewhere else..

    We are OVERCLOCKERS not OVERCLOCKEE's...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
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    Hey, I also have an ASUS P2B-F Mobo...I've been using it for almost a year now and I'm quite satisfied with its performance...I think its the most stable board when overclocked and compared to other boards with CPUs running at the same speed, it has the highest benchmarks due to its superior CPU-memory bus performance.

    It is true however that board has no voltage tweaks but you can remedy this by taping some pins in your PIII SECC2 Cartridge to change the core voltage of your CPU...You can find this procedure at 3D Hardware.net but you must also be careful not to tape the wrong pins (or let the tape get accidentally removed) or you may over-volt your processor..

    I suggest first that you download SoftFSB and experiment with other FSB speeds rather than going for 112Mhz FSB immediately...You can try 103, 105, 110 FSB without voltage tweaking and see if your system is stable at any of these settings. Just remember that a 33MHz (or lower) increase in CPU speed isn't worth it if you have to increase your core voltage to get to that setting.

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