A stupid question...
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    47

    A stupid question...

    I have a question... My computer runs a PII/400 @ 448. My m/b is an Elitegroup and I can change only the FSB (112 Mhz). No voltage or AGP/PCI speeds etc...
    Until now I have no problem with my HD (WD 13GB UDMA66 - running at 33), my memory, or from my cards.
    And the big question is... If I upgrade to an Abit BP6 and dual Celeron 366/450 (or more), should I expect the same stability, even my Celerons could make about 600? I now run a FSB at 112Mhz, and there is no way to have more FSB speed with Celerons. Or am I wrong?
    Thank you in advance.
    Vassilis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 1998
    Location
    CANADA
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    Some Celerons can make it up over 112MHz, but dont count on it. Unfortunately, the answer is more complicated than it would seem. The fact that your system is stable at 112MHz means, if you got a dual Celeron system, your memory would definitely be in the clear. However, in terms of AGP, PCI and HD stability, a setting of 83MHz or there abouts is far less stable than even 112MHz. Why? Because the PCI and AGP clocks operate on a divider, directly related to your FSB. For FSB settings in the 66MHz area (66, 75, 83, etc..) the PCI operates at 1/2 the FSB, and the AGP at 1/1 with the FSB. For FSB settings in the 100MHz area, (100, 103, 112 etc..) the PCI operates at 1/3, and the AGP at 2/3. So, in essence, an FSB of 112 will give a PCI clock of 37.3MHz, and an AGP clock of 74.6MHz, which should be stable (specs are 33 PCI, and 66 AGP). Running at 83MHz FSB will give a PCI clock of a whopping 41.5MHz, and an AGP clock of 83MHz. That may not be stable, in fact, most people having trouble with overclocking tend to have it at the 83MHz mark. If you can run your new Celerons at 100MHz FSB, everything will be fine. 75MHz will likely be fine as well, but there are no guarantees about 83MHz.

    That was slightly complicated, i know, so if you need some clarification, dont hesitate to ask.

    ------------------
    "In the computer industry, there are three kinds of lies;
    lies, damn lies, and benchmarks."
    "In the computer industry, there are three kinds of lies;
    lies, damn lies, and benchmarks."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    47
    Thanks! I think I got it... The conclusion is that I got more stable system at 100 or 112 Mhz than 83... (supposing that the CPUs will run at this speed)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 1998
    Location
    CANADA
    Posts
    772
    Thats right. 83Mhz is one of the most unstable settings you can possibly run on. 66 and 100MHz will give you no problem whatsoever, and if you can run fine on 112MHz, then 75Mhz should be fairly safe as well. Of course, thats not to say 83MHz WONT work. My system runs perfectly stable at 83, should i want it to. You merely have a better chance for success at different settings.

    ------------------
    "In the computer industry, there are three kinds of lies;
    lies, damn lies, and benchmarks."
    "In the computer industry, there are three kinds of lies;
    lies, damn lies, and benchmarks."

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